The Nurture Versus Biosocial Debate in Criminology: On the Origins of Criminal Behavior and Criminality

Cover
Kevin M. Beaver, J.C. Barnes, Brian B. Boutwell
SAGE Publications, 31.01.2014 - 472 Seiten
0 Rezensionen
The Nurture Versus Biosocial Debate in Criminology: On the Origins of Criminal Behavior and Criminality takes a contemporary approach to address the sociological and the biological positions of human behavior by allowing preeminent scholars in criminology to speak to the effects of each on a range of topics. Kevin M. Beaver, J.C. Barnes, and Brian B. Boutwell aim to facilitate an open and honest debate between the more traditional criminologists who focus primarily on environmental factors and contemporary biosocial criminologists who examine the interplay between biology/genetics and environmental factors.
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

WHY WE NEED A NATURENURTURE BOOK IN CRIMINOLOGY
1
KEY CRIMINOLOGICAL CORRELATES
9
SOCIOLOGICAL EXPLANATIONS OF THE GENDER GAP IN OFFENDING
10
A BIOSOCIAL EXPLANATION FOR MALEFEMALE DIFFERENCES IN CRIMINAL INVOLVEMENT
25
SOCIOLOGICAL VIEWPOINT ON THE RACECRIME RELATIONSHIP
43
HUMAN BIODIVERSITY AND THE EGALITARIAN FICTION
55
A SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL CLASS
75
THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE AND TEMPERAMENT IN INTERPRETING THE SESCRIME RELATIONSHIP
91
SPECIFIC TYPES OF ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIORS
253
WHEN VIOLENCE IS THE NORM SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE
254
SOME KIND OF MADNESS THE BIOSOCIAL ORIGINS OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE
269
PARENTS PEERS AND SOCIALIZATION TO INSTITUTIONS IN CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE IMPLICATIONS FOR DELINQUENT BE...
283
A BIOSOCIAL REVIEW ON CHILDHOOD ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOR
301
SOCIOLOGICAL CRIMINOLOGY AND DRUG USE A REVIEW OF LEADING THEORIES
315
DRUG ABUSE ADDICTION AND CRIME A CELL TO SOCIETY PERSPECTIVE
333
TRENDS CURRENT ISSUES AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS
351

THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES
109
LEARNING THEORIES OF CRIME
110
THE INTEGRATION OF BIOLOGICAL AND GENETIC FACTORS INTO SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY
125
SELFCONTROL AND CRIME A SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE
143
LOW SELFCONTROL IS A BRAINBASED DISORDER
172
THE ROLE OF THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT IN GENERAL STRAIN THEORY
184
GENERAL STRAIN THEORY AND BIOSOCIAL CRIMINOLOGY PATHWAYS TO SUCCESSFUL THEORETICAL INTEGRATION
199
SOCIAL BONDING AND CRIME
218
A BIOSOCIAL VIEW OF SOCIAL BOND THEORY
236
A SOCIOLOGICAL EXPLANATION OF CRIME RATES AND TRENDS
352
DARWIN DAWKINS WRIGHT PINKER AND THE REASONS THAT CRIME DECLINED
363
THE AGE AND CRIME RELATIONSHIP SOCIAL VARIATION SOCIAL EXPLANATIONS
377
THE PUZZLING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE AND CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR A BIOSOCIAL CRITIQUE OF THE CRIMINOLOGICAL STA...
397
POLICY IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES OF CRIME WHY ARE THEY SO SELDOM CONSIDERED OR DISCUSSED?
415
POLICY IMPLICATIONS OF BIOSOCIAL CRIMINOLOGY CRIME PREVENTION AND OFFENDER REHABILITATION
431
INDEX
447
ABOUT THE EDITORS
461
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Über den Autor (2014)

Kevin M. Beaver is a professor in the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University and a visiting distinguished professor in the Center for Social and Humanities Research at King Abdulaziz University. He is the past recipient of the American Society of Criminology’s Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award and the National Institute of Justice’s Graduate Research Fellowship. He has published widely on the development of antisocial behaviors from a biosocial perspective, and his research on the genetic underpinnings to crime has been featured in major media outlets.

J.C. Barnes is an assistant professor in the Criminology Program at The University of Texas at Dallas. He is a biosocial criminologist whose research seeks to understand how genetic and environmental factors combine to impact criminological phenomena. Recent works have attempted to reconcile behavioral genetic findings with theoretical developments in criminology. He has published more than seventy papers and book chapters in outlets such as Aggressive Behavior, Behavior Genetics, Criminology, Developmental Psychology, Intelligence, Journal of Marriage and Family, Justice Quarterly, Journal of Theoretical Biology, and PLoS ONE.

Brian B. Boutwell is currently an assistant professor in the College of Criminal Justice at Sam Houston State University. His research interests span a variety of disciplines and include behavior genetics, developmental psychology, evolutionary psychology, as well as life course and theoretical criminology. His work has appeared in such journals as Developmental Psychology, Behavior Genetics, Theoretical Biology, Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, and Aggressive Behavior, among others.

Bibliografische Informationen