THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND FROM THE ABDICATION OF JAMES THE SECOND

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Seite 459 - Try me, good king, but let me have a lawful trial ; and let not my sworn enemies sit as my accusers and judges ; yea, let me receive an open trial, (for my truth shall fear no open shame...
Seite 459 - I rightly conceived your meaning ; and if, as you say, confessing a truth indeed may procure my safety, I shall with all willingness and duty, perform your command.
Seite 186 - ... had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, he would not have given me over in my gray hairs.
Seite 459 - ... for whose sake I am now as I am, whose name I could some good while since have pointed unto, your grace not being ignorant of my suspicion therein.
Seite 444 - Christ was the word that spake it, He took the bread and brake it, And what that word did make it, That I believe and take it.
Seite 71 - The king started a little, and said : ' By my faith, my lord, I thank you for your good cheer, but I may not endure to have my laws broken in my sight. My attorney must speak with you.
Seite 465 - Now have we many chimneys ; and yet our tenderlings complain of rheums, catarrhs, and poses ; then had we none but reredosses, and our heads did never ache. For as the smoke in those days was supposed to be a sufficient hardening for the timber of the house, so it was reputed a far better medicine to keep the good-man and his family from the quack or pose, wherewith, as then, very few were acquainted.
Seite 459 - Your Grace's displeasure, and my imprisonment, are things so strange unto me, as what to write, or what to excuse, I am altogether ignorant. Whereas you send unto me (willing me to confess a truth, and so obtain your favour) by such an one, whom you know to be mine ancient professed enemy; I no sooner received this message by him than I rightly conceived your meaning; and if, as you say, confessing a truth, indeed may procure my safety, I shall with all willingness and duty perform your command.
Seite 72 - By means of this law, joined to the beginning luxury and refinements of the age. the great fortunes of the barons were gradually dissipated, and the property of the commons increased in England. It is probable that Henry foresaw and intended this consequence ; because the constant scheme of his policy consisted in depressing the great, and exalting churchmen, lawyers, and men of new families, who were more dependent on him.
Seite 228 - ... for her advancement : from a private gentlewoman, she said, he had first made her a marchioness, then a queen; and now, since he could raise her no higher in this world, he was sending her to be a saint in heaven. She then renewed the protestations of her innocence, and recommended her daughter to his care. Before the lieutenant of the Tower, and all who approached her, she made the like declarations ; and continued to behave herself with her usual serenity, and even with cheerfulness.

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