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The purpour sone, with tendir bemys reid, In orient bricht as angell did appeir, - Throw goldin skyis putting up his heid, Quinois gilt, tressi wondir cleir, That all the world tuke comfort, fer and neir, To luke upone his fresche and blissfull face, Doing all sable fro the heavenis chace, And as the blissful sonne of cherarcley The fowlis sung throw comfort of the licht ; The burdis did with open vocis cry, O luvaris fo, away thow dully nicht, And welcum day that comfortis every wicht; . Hail May, hail Flora, hail Aurora schene, Hail princes Nature, hail Venus, Luvis quene:

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reign, the 28th of April, 1292, the works of the new chapel began, and continued for more than two years. An account of the expence of these operations is preserved in rolls of weekly payments remaining in the exchequer, which I have been indulged with the perusal of, by our learned brother, Craven Grd, esq. F. R. S. These curious rolls contain the articles purchased within the week, and the daily payments to each workman of every denomination. The several articles bought are stated; then follow the payments to workmen. They are too minute to be here enumerated, but these are apparent—to carpenters five pence each per day;—to other workmen three pence halfpenny; —some three pence;—some two pence halfpenny each. Although the amount of each feparate week does not appear to be much, being in general between

twenty and thirty pounds, yet, from the length of time which the works continued, the cost of the whole must have been very confiderable. Whether king Edward I. completed his defigns in beautifying this strućture, we are not informed; but if he had, his labours were soon after unfortunately rendered abortive; for we are told by a very accurate chronicler, Stow— “ that on the 29th of March, 1298, a vehement fire being kindled in the lesser hall of the king's palace at Westminster, the flame thereof being driven with the wind, fired the mouastery adjoining : which, with the palace, were both consumed.” This disastrous event could not be repaired for some time following ; for Edward I. being almost constantly engaged, in the latter part of his reign, either in external wars, or in the conquest of Scotland, the prevailing objećt in the mind of that monarch, he cannot be supposed to have had either leisure or wealth to bestow on works of art; and the weak and turbulent reign of his son, Edward II. did not allow much time for domestic improvements. But early in the succeeding reign this building engaged the royal attention; for, on the 27th of May, 1330, 4 Edw. III. the works on this chapel again commenced. The comptroller's roll of the expence of these operations, for near three years, is remaining in the king's remembrancer's office, in the exchequer. The length of this account will not allow of the whole to be here inserted ; but it is extremely curious, because it preserves the names

* Other poets of inferior reputation flourished during this period in Scotland; but it is the purport of this history to record the progressive improvements, not

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names of every artist employed, the wages they received, and the price of every article used, as far as the account Continues. The amount of the wages, during the whole time of this account, was 35ol. 12s, oid. ; and of the materials used in the building, 1581. 4s. 4; d. ; making together 508l. 16s. 5; d. These works were not completed for several years after the termination of this account; but on the 6th of August, 1348, in the 22d year of Edward III. that king, by his royal charter, recited that a spacious chapel, fituate within the palace of Westminster, in honour of St. Stephen, protomartyr, had been nobly begun by his progenitors, and had been completed at his own expence, which, to the honour of Almighty God, and especially of the blessed Mary his mother, and of the said martyr, he ordained, constituted, and appointed to be collegiate. Notwithstanding this constitution of the college, yet it is evident that the chapel was not then finished; for on the 18th of March, 1350, in the 24th Edward III. the king appointed Hugh de St. Albans, then master of the painters for the works within the chapel, to take and choose as many painters, and other workmen, as should be necessary for carrying on the works in the chapel, as he should find in the counties of Kent, Middlesex, Essex, Surry, and Sussex; such workmen to be employed and paid at the expence of the king. Rymer's Foedera, tom. 5, p. 670. A like appointment was made of John Athelard, for the counties of Lincoln, Northampton, Oxford, Warwick, and Leicester ; and of

Benedićt Nightengale, for the Sounties of Cambridge, Hunting. don, Norfolk, and Suffolk. Again in the 37th Edward III. June 4th, 1363, according to Rymer, William de Walfingham was appointed to take a sufficient number of painters and workmen, to be employed at the charge of the king, in the chapel of St. Stephen, within the royal palace. Unfor. tunately the accounts of these workmen have not come to our view. King Edward III. erected, for the use of this college, at some dis. tance west, in the Little San&uary, out of the palace court, a firong clochard, or bell tower, of stone and timber, covered with lead; and placed therein three great bells, which were afterwards usually rung at coronations, triumphs, and funerals of princes, which gave such a huge sound, that was commonly, said they soured all the drink in the town. Howell's Londinopolis, p. 378. This college of St. Stephen was valued at the suppression to be worth 19851. Ios. 5d. and was surrendered in the first year of king Edward VI. A list of the deans and canons of this college may be seen in Newcourt's Repertorian. The chapel of St. Stephen was soon afterwards fitted up for the meeting of the house of commons, which had before usually affembled in the chapter house of the abbey of Westminster, and has fince continued to be appropriated to tie same use, to the present time.

Of ancient Spain and its original 1. habitants. From Mannert's o, zhern Geography of the Creek; an Formans. THE

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THE name of Spain is probably of Phoenician origin. The Romans borrowed it from the Carthaginians, through whom they first became acquainted with the country. The Greeks every where call it Iberia, without attaching always the same idea to the denomination. The elder Greeks, till the period of the Achaean league and of their closer acquaintance with Roman affairs, understood by it the whole sea-coast from the columns of Hercules to the mouth of the Rhine : because throughout this distrićt, the Iberi were to be found, sometimes apart, sometimes mingled with Ligurians. The river Ebro has its name from them. The sea-coast beyond the pillars they called Tarteffis. The interior of the country went long without a name among the inhabitants, because each nation considered itself as a whole, and lived nearly unconnected with its neighbours. Among the Greeks, it obtained the vague name of Kelrica; which was also applied to the whole north-west of Europe. Time altered these ideas, and the latter Greeks appropriate the name Iberia to the same country which the Romans called ‘Hispania. Even this last name the Greeks occafionally use, but understand by it the region between the Pyrenees and Iber or Ebro. Not till the second or third century was the Latin name fully received into the Greek tongue, although earlier infiances occur. west country, is a common name among the Greek poets both for Italy and Spain; for the latter, with the occasional epithet ultima. History mentions as the most anI

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