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principles, some stating the whole
quantities of grain produced, others
the number of acres sown, and
others again the average produce of
each acre; and drawing, in some
instances, a comparison with the
crop of last year, in others with
that of certain preceding years,
and in others with what is general-
ly called a fair crop, that it is ex-
tremely difficult to combine and
compare them, so as to flate accu-
rately the result of the whole.
Your committee would have en-
deavoured to render this investiga-
tion more complete, if they had
not felt the great importance of
suggesting, without further delay,
such measures as have occurred to
them for alleviating an evil which
evidently exists to such an extent
as to call for the most effectual re-
medy.
From the best confideration of
such information as they have hi-
therto obtained, they should not
feel themselves authorized in as-
suming, as the ground of any opi-
nion they may offer, that the defi-
ciency of the crop of wheat is less
than from one fifth to one sixth,
compared with the crop of last year,
and from one fourth to one fifth,
compared with an average crop.
The crop of rye, of which no great
quantity is usually grown, may pro-
bably be confidered as equally de-
ficient; but the crops of barley and
oats are represented to be nearly
double those of 1794, and at least
one fifth better than an average
crop.
It appears also, from the concur-
rent testimony of intelligent per-
isons, that the stock of wheat in
hand at the commencement of the
last harvest was much less than at
the same period of the preceding

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tended to all classes of the people,
if they can be induced to employ
the other resource to which your
committee have referred, and to
avail themselves of the abundance
of other crops to supply the defici-

ency of wheat.
For the purpose of ascertaining
in what proportion the articles be-
fore enumerated, and others, could
be mixed with wheat, so as to pro-
duce a bread likely to answer the
purposes of general consumption.
your committee have examined the
result of a variety of experiments,
made by the vićtualling office, un-
der the dire&tion of the privy
council, and ordered to be com-
municated to them ; and of further
experiments, since made by the
same office, under the direction of
your committee; and have been
also assisted by the Board of Agri-
culture, who have communicated
to them an account of trials made
with a still greater variety of mix-
tures. Your committee see no rea-
son to doubt that good bread may
be made from any of these mix-
tures, with no greater proportion
than three-fifths or two-thirds of
wheaten flour; and there is the best
reason for concluding that such
bread would be wholesome and
nutritive, because in many parts of
of this country, where labour and
industry are carried to as great an
extent as in any other, the people
are wholly fed by bread made of
some one or more of the compon-
ent parts of these mixtures. Your
committee are further encouraged
in this opinion, by finding, that in
the course of the last feason, the
use of mixed bread of various kinds
has been introduced into general
consumption in many places whose
consumption was before confined
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into consideration the present High

Price of Corn. ,

THE committee beg leave to lay before the house, as an appendix to their last report, an account of the experiments made by the vićtualling office upon different kinds of mixed bread, under the directions of the privy council, and of this committee; they have not thought it necessary to add to the account of the experiments made by the Board of Agriculture, as they understand that it is the intention of that board to communicate that account to the public, together with their observations thereupon.

The committee have proceeded to take into further consideration different branches of this extensive subject. Being aware, however, that some of them contain matter which ought not to be made the object of regulation, except upon mature deliberation, and a clear convićtion of necessity, they have thought it most consistent with their duty, to defer making any further report till after the recess; but they É. leave to add to this appendix, a few papers which have been communicated to them ; not as intimating any opinion whatsoever, as to the different observations and suggestions contained in these papers, but with a view of drawing attention to the principal points of which it may be necessary for the committee to resume the consideration.

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An account, shewing the produce of one quarter of wheat, barley, oats, and rye, respectively,
dressed throxgh a thirteen shilling cloth, and of the denomination of standard, or the
whole of the slour of the grain, from which the loaves, presented to a committee of
the honourable House of Commons on the 9th instant, were manufactured as specified
in the accompanying schedule. -

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