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who have basely assassinated our ministers, and burnt our ships at Toulon : the hour of vengeance and retribution is near at hand. But let the people remain tranquil; we are friends to all the people, and more particularly the descendants of Brutus, of Scipio, and the great men we have taken for our models. Iłe-establish the capitol, and place there, with honour, the statues of the heroes that rendered it celebrated ; awaken the Roman people, debased by many centuries of slavery : such will be the fruit of your vićtories; they will form an epoch for posterity; you will have the immortal glory of changing the face of the finest country in Europe. The free French people, respected by the whole world, will give to Europe a glorious peace, which will indemnity them for the sacrifices they have made during six years ; you will then return to your homes, and your fellow-citizens will say, shewing you, this man war of the army of Italy. (Signed) BU on APARTE. The Deputies of the People of A/2, to Citizen Buonaparte, Genera/ in Chief of the French Army, to procure Liberty to Italy. Citizen General, LIKE Frenchmen we wish to be free. To live under no king or tyrant of any title. We wish for civil equality, and that the feudal monster should be thrown to the ground. For this purpose we have taken up arms at the approach of your victorious troops, and we come to implore your a slistance, to break the chains which have for a long time retained us in bondage. R Yorn

Worn down by the yoke of iron which presses on our heads, we never should have been able to succeed in relieving ourselves. Always courageous, and yet always debased, we have lived in expectation of the happy monient of your arrival. Oh! most delightful moment The time is at length arrived. Here are Frenchmen, our brothers and our friends: in our arms, in our houses, they are willing cordially to partake of our joy, to ratify our vows, and to fly with us to the destruction of the infamous throne of our tyrant. The proclamation to the people and clergy of Piedmont and Lombardy, and to the Neapolitan and Piedmontese troops, prove to you our republican spirit, and the right which we have to a well-founded reliance on your generous protection. - Citizen general, behold all Italy extending forth its arms to your embrace, and calling you its deliwerer. In giving it the bleslings of liberty, you grant to this beautiful part of Europe its greatest lustre ; your name will be rendered glorious and immortal in its history. Our sons, and our latest posterity, will have it engraved in their hearts; and they will not have in their mouths a name more dear than that of general Buonaparte. Respect, health, and fraternity, (Signed) IGNACE Bo NAFOUX, Albe, JEAN ANTO INE, Ramea of Verseil, Deputed commissaries.

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try in Europe from the iron yoke of the proud house of Austria, that the French army has braved obstacles the most difficult to furmount. Victory, in union with justice, has crowned its efforts. The wreck of the enemy's army has retired beyond the Mincio. The French army, in order to follow them, passes over the territory of the republic of Venice; but it will never forget, that antient friendship unites the two republics. Religion, government, cu'oms, and property, shall be respected. . That the people may be without apprehension the most severe discipline shall be maintained. All that may be provided for the army shall be faithfully paid for in money. The general in chief engages the officers of the republic of Venice, the magistrates, and the priests, to make known these sentiments to the people, in order that confidence may cement that friendship which has so long united the two nations faithful in the path of honour, as in that of victory. The French soldier is terrible only to the enemies of his liberty and his government. (Signed) BUoN A PARTE, The general of division, chief of the etat-major of the army of Italy. (Signed) Alex. BeRTHIER,

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as necessary to Europe, as it is to the subjects of the emperor. The cause I am about to defend is your own. You have been long vexed and fatigued by the horrors of a war, undertaken not for the interest of the people of Germany, but for that of a single family. The French army respects and loves all nations, more especially the fimple and virtuous inhabitants of the mountains. Your religion, your customs will be every where respected. Our troops will maintain a severe discipline; and nothing will be taken in the country without being paid for in money. You will receive us with hospitality, and we will treat you with fraternity and friendship. But should there be any so little acquainted with their true interests as to take up arms, and treat us as enemies, we will be as terrible as the fire from heaven : we will burn the houses, and lay waste the territories of the villages which shall take a part in a war which is foreign to them. Do not suffer yourselves to be led into an error by the agents of Austria. Secure your country, already harassed by five years of war, from new miseries. In a little time the court of Vienna, forced to a peace, will restore to the nations their privileges which it has usurped, and to Europe the tranquillity it has disturbed. The commander in chief, (Signed) Buo NAP ARTE.

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HIS royal highness is conscious of having nothing to reproach himself with relative to his frank, candid, and friendly conduct towards the French republic and its subjećts. A sovereign in friendship with the republic cannot but regard, with the most extraordinary surprise, the orders given to your excellency from the directory. His royal highness will not resist the execution of them by force, but will preserve the good understanding with the republic, still flattering himself with the hope that your excellency will, on better information, revoke your present resolves. Should it not be in your excellency's power to delay the entrance of your troops into Leghorn till further orders, the governor of that place has full powers to agree with you upon terms. This I am ordered, by my sovereign's express command, to communicate to you, with that respect in which I have the honour to remain, &c. (Signed) Vittorio Fosso MBRON I. Florence, June 26, 1796.

Head-7tarter; at Leghorn, june 29.

General Buonaparte to the Grand Duke
of Toscany.
Roy AL HIGHN ess,

AN hour before we entered Leghorn, an English frigate carried off two French ships, worth 500,ooo livres. The governor suffered them to be taken under the fire of his batteries, which was contrary to the intention of your royal highness, and the neutrality of the port of Leghorn.

! prefer a complaint to your roy

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