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that sort ought to prevent an accommodation, and he moved as amendment to the address, to fignify the concern of the house, that any form of government in that count should induce the king to be averse to peace; and to requesi that, set...ting aside all considerations of that nature, he would direct his ministers to treat with the enemy on safe and honourable terms. ed by Mr. Grey, who advanced a variety of facts and reasonings upon them to prove the propriety of treating. to: the present opportunity, Mr. Pitt replied, none had offered to encourage ideas of peace, which, however, had not been prevented by the mere existence of a republic in France, but by a total absence of any species of regular government. The change now was mas nifest: the new constitution was contrary to the doctrine of universal equality; the French had now a mixed form of government, admitting of distinétions in society : and their legislature was not constructed on a pure democracy. This fully authorized ministry to confider them in quite another light than formerly; but did not surnish any pretence for depriving ministers of their right to act in the name of the executive power, without undue interference, which must certainly be the case, were the amendment to be adopted. . Mr. Fox severely reprehended ministry for pretending that, tilt now, the government of France was incapable of maintaining the relations of peace and amity with other nations. They had maintained them successively with every power they had treated, with ; nor was the character of the present rulers,

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rulers of that country more favourable to the preserving of such relations. Ministers ought, in the mean time, to be reminded with what powers they had not scrupled to enter into treaties of amity, and of what deeds they had, in consequence, been the abettors. Mr. Fox reviewed the events of the war with great accuracy and precision, with a view of shewing the ill management of those who had conducted it. He ridiculed the idea, that the French were more deserving of confidence on account of their new constitution; their principles were still the same, though they had adopted another mode of ruling. But neither those principles, nor their antecedent government, ought to have been made the pretext for waging a war of extermination. It was time to end it on any conditions, not derogatory to the dignity of this, country; and ministry ought no longer to be suffered to protract the war, on the pretence they had so continually, but falsely, alleged, of incapacity in the enemy to maintain a good understanding. The sentiments of Mr. Dundas were, that to offer terms of peace to the enemy would he attended with no disgrace, but that ministers, in such case, should be left to act discretionally, and not to be compelled to make a peace of which they disapproved. The amendment, for that reason, was inequitable, as it fettered their operations against all experience and precedent. He denied the object of the war to be the restoration of despotism in France, or that this country could have indulged the hope of an advantageous peace till the present

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the successes of the French had rendered them untractable, and it was only fince their late defeats that reasonable men had begun to hope for equitable conditions. Never before had they, during the whole of this war, condescended to express the least willingness to reconciliation. The king's message could not have been delivered at a fitter opportunity: the supplies for the continuance of the war had been ranted, and the nation had proved itself able and willing to maintain the contest. This was exactly the fituation in which we should appear to the enemy, upon whom it would doubtless make that impression which was intended. It would convince the French, that, however we might be defirous of peace, we were ready for war, and not disposed to treat on dishonourable terms. The debate closed by rejećting the amendment and carrying the i. A finilar one to this was, on the next day, tenth of December, proposed and passed in the house of lords, On the fifteen of February, Mr. Grey introduced his motion for peace by a speech, wherein he observed, that, contrary to general expectation, the ministry, in lieu of a negociation for peace, were making preparations for a continuation of the war. But with what well-grounded hope of success could they persist in this unfortunate system? There was no confidence nor unity of views in the remaining parts of the coalition; and yet this country was to bear the weight of this pretended alliance in favour of the common interest of Europe. The public was exhorted to rely on the discretion of ministers: but were

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