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nnion, which was the objećt principally required, could not be effected, while such a separation of interests was suffered to exist. It would open a door to perpetual variances, which might eventually endanger the very existence of the government they were about to establish, by breaking the principal bond of unity on which it was to be founded. After a multiplicity of debates upon this subjeći, the importance of a solid union of all the provinces, into one common state, appeared so indispensible, that it was unanimously agreed to, on the first day of December, 1796. To remove the objection that had principally stood in the way of this decision, a commission of the most respectable members of the convention was appointed to examine and state the former debts of the respective provinces, and to confider of the most equitable and satisfactory manner of liquidating them, by providing for their extinétion, and preserving, at the same time, uninjured, the rights and interests of all the parties concerned in this liquidation. In all these transactions, the members of the Dutch convention were remarkably cautious in permitting no visible interference in their deliberations on the part of the French government. Its secret influence was well known; but the preservation of every form and external indication of freedom, was judged indis. pensible, in order to maintain the apparent dignity of the state, and, what was of more consequence in the eye of the discerning, to prevent the French themselves, at any future period, from pleading a right of interfering, from any acknowledged precedent. The directory was also very careful in abstaining from all

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murmurs and resentment. For these reasons the directory affected every sentiment of respect for this national convention of the United Provinces, and treated it with every outward mark of their confidering it as the representative of an independent nation. . . . . " “But the regard shewn, by France, to the republic of Holländ, was measured solely by the consideration of its weight in the political scale, which, however deprested by circumfiances, might still recover the level of its former importance. The directory did not extend the same deference to those whom it deemed more subjeolgo to its power. This was remarkably evinced in its condrići towards Geneva. This little republic had invariably remained attached to the interests of the revolution in France, ever since its first breaking out; and had gone hand in hand with it through all its variations. Relying on these proofs of its sidelity, it now requested the direstory to confirm its independence, by making it a clause in the treaties between France and other powers. But this request did not coincide with the views of the directory, which had, it secns, in contemplation the annexation of Geneva to the dominion of France. In purfiance of this project, an intimation was given to the Genevans, that their interest would be better constited, and their freedom secured, by be. coming a part of the French republic. This intimation was highly disgust

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extent, had obtained a ... ved reputation throughout Europe, by the industry and ingenuity of its inhabitants; and, more than all, by the distinguished figure it had maintained, and the high spirit it had displayed, in those active and temestuous scenes that were produced I. the reformation. It had long been considered as the original seat of calvinism, and the rival of Rome itself in matters of religion. Here the famous founder of that sect lived and died, after having, by his unconquerable courage, laid the foundation of the most resolute association of men that ever figured in modern ages. From the principles which he inculcated, arose that reformation in religion which was grafted on republican maxims. Hence it was immediately adopted by all that aspired at freedom. It filled France with the most intrepid asserters of civil as well as religious rights. It spread into the low countries, where it erected the republic of Holland. It made its way into England and Scotland, where it gradually animated the inquisitive and daring spirits of the last century in this country to those researches into the nature of government, and to those exer. tions in the cause of national freedom, which, had not fanaticism intervened, would probably have terminated so happily for all parties. Geneva, during the fixteenth and seventeenth centuries, had been the central point of communication between the principal actors of this high spirited party. Beza, a far reater charaćter than Calvin, no ss inflexible, but much less austere, added lustre and importance to this place, by his learning and many other respečtable qualitics. He con[N 3 ] tinued

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directory.

ments of knowledge and polite learning, that conduce to the utility and glory of a nation. " Desirous of giving this revival of the encouragements, due to literature, all the solemnity of which it was susceptible, the directory appointed the fourth of April, 1796, for a public meeting of all the members of the national institute, established the preceding year, at the aera of the new constitution. The meeting was held in the largest hall of the ancient palace of the Louvre. All the literati, and all the men of genius and reputation in the polite and liberal arts attended. The directory, the councils, and all persons in the principal departments of government were present, together with the foreign ministers, and as many spectators as the hall could contain. The purpose of the meeting was formally announced, in a speech made by the president of the France, he said, delivered from past miseries, had now resolved to revive those arts, through the cultivation of which ihe nation had risen to so high a degree of reputation, and commanded the re

spect of all Europe. It was the de

termination of government, to pay them all the attention, and give them all the encouragement and recompense which they could possibly claim from a free and enlightened people. The president of the na-. tional institute, citizen Dufaulx, replied, in the name of his brethren, that they were all equally animated with the love of freedom, of knowledge, and of arts; that they were firmly attached to the republic from principle, and the consciousness that in the bosom of freedom all those

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