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and carried to the directory, by whom it was confidered as indubitable proof of the inimical disposition of the American government to the French republic. This letter, on a cool perusal, contained however, no hostile defigns against France. Its contents were chiefly complaints of the arbitrary proceedings of the British ministry respecting the trade of the United States. He direéted Mr.Morris, who had quitted his embassy at Paris, and acted as American agent at London, to lay before the English ministry the imprudence, as well as the unjustifiableness of those proceedings, at a time when Great Britain ought to be particularly solicitous to retain the good will of the Americans, in order to induce them to receive favourably the treaty of commerce just old. but which met with a multitude of

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measures that had been so unseason. taken against the commerce and navigation of the united states. It was with difficulty he had stemmed the torrent of discontent and resentment that had arisen on this occasion, and prevented the party, that favoured the French, from carrying matters to extremities. His own views, in which he was feconded by the better sort, were peace and neutrality. These would, in the course of a few years, raise the United States to a condition of prosperity and power, that would render them formidable to all the world, and secure to them tranquillity at home, and respect from abroad. Such was the general tenour of this famous letter, the interception of which was looked upon as so timely an occurrence for the interest

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