The Symbolism of Evil

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Beacon Press, 1967 - 357 Seiten
"According to Ricoeur, the most primal and spontaneous symbols of evil are defilement, sin and guilt ... Ricoeur moves from the elementary symbols of evil into the rich world of myths ... and he ends by suggesting that the clue to the relation between philosophy to mythology is to be found in the aphorism 'The symbol gives rise to the thought' ... Ricoeur's method and argument are too intricate and rich to assess in so short a review. Suffice it to say that this is the most massive accomplisment of any philosopher within the ambience of Christian faith since the appearance of Gabriel Marcel" - Sam Keen, The Christian Century
 

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Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

PHENOMENOLOGY OF CONFESSION
3
DEFILEMENT
25
SIN
47
GUILT
100
RECAPITULATION OF THE SYMBOLISM
151
THE SYMBOLIC FUNCTION OF MYTHS
161
Toward a Typology of the Myths of the Beginning
171
The Ritual Reenactment of the Creation and the Figure
191
The Penitential Motivation of the Adamic Myth
235
The Instant of the Fall
243
The Lapse of Time of the Drama of Temptation
252
Justification and Eschatological Symbols
260
THE MYTH OF THE EXILED SOUL
279
The Final Myth
289
Salvation and Knowledge
300
THE CYCLE OF THE MYTHS
306

THE WICKED GOD AND THE TRAGIC
211
The Crux of the Tragic
218
Deliverance from the Tragic or Deliverance within
227
THE SYMBOL GIVES RISE TO THOUGHT 347
346
RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVES
358
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (1967)

Paul Ricoeur (27 February 1913 - 20 May 2005) was a French philosopher best known for combining phenomenological description with hermeneutics. As such his thought is situated within the same tradition as other major hermeneutic phenomenologists, Martin Heidegger and Hans-Georg Gadamer. In 2000 he was awarded the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy for having "revolutionized the methods of hermeneutic phenomenology, expanding the study of textual interpretation to include the broad yet concrete domains of mythology, biblical exegesis, psychoanalysis, theory of metaphor, and narrative theory.