A History of the Earth and Animated Nature: In Three Volumes : Illustrated with a Portrait and Numerous Plates, Band 2

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Seite 503 - But of all those sounds, there is none so dismally hollow as the booming of the bittern. It is impossible for words to give those who have not heard this evening call an adequate idea of its solemnity. It is like the interrupted bellowing of a bull, but hollower and louder, and is heard at a mile's distance, as if issuing from some formidable being that resided at the bottom of the waters.
Seite 396 - See! from the brake the whirring pheasant springs, And mounts exulting on triumphant wings: Short is his joy; he feels the fiery wound, Flutters in blood, and panting beats the ground. Ah! what avail his glossy, varying dyes, His purple crest, and scarlet-circled eyes, The vivid green his shining plumes unfold, His painted wings, and breast that flames with gold?
Seite 314 - ... of thought or common sense. She mistakes a piece of chalk for an egg, and sits upon it in the same manner. She is insensible of any increase or diminution in the number of those she lays. She does not distinguish between her own and...
Seite 347 - Sometimes, however, they are brought to have an attachment for their feeder ; they are then highly serviceable, and liberally provide for his pleasures and support. When the falconer lets them go from his hand they play about...
Seite 315 - Paper, it seems the immediate Direction of Providence, and such an Operation of the supreme Being, as that which determines all the Portions of Matter to their proper Centres.
Seite 481 - There are never more than two eggs found in the nest ; these are about the size of small peas, and as white as snow, with here and there a yellow speck. The male and the female sit upon the nest by turns ; but the female takes to herself the greatest share. She seldom quits the...
Seite 362 - III. to steal a hawk. To take its eggs, even in a person's own ground, was punishable with imprisonment for a year and a day, together with a fine at the king's pleasure. In...
Seite 423 - Between the head and the bill there is a black line of separation all round the base of the bill ; in the upper part of which the nostrils are placed, and are almost covered with feathers ; which has occasioned some writers to say that the toucan has no nostrils. Round the eyes, on each side of the head, is a space of bluish skin, void of feathers, above which the head is black, except a white spot on each side joining to the base of the upper chap. The hinder part of the neck, the back, wings, tail,...
Seite 389 - In the indulgence of these capricious pursuits, walls cannot easily confine it; it strips the tops of houses of their tiles or thatch, it lays waste the labours of the gardener, roots up his choicest seeds, and nips his favourite flowers in the bud. Thus its beauty but ill recompenses for the mischief it occasions ; and many of the more homely-looking fowls are very deservedly preferred before it.
Seite 481 - They lay two eggs at a time, and never more, about the size of small peas, and as white as snow, with here and there a yellow speck. The male and the female sit upon the nest by turns ; but the female takes to herself the greatest share. She seldom quits the...

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