The British Essayists: The Spectator

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J. Johnson, J. Nichols and Son, R. Baldwin, F. and C. Rivington, W. Otridge and Son, W. J. and J. Richardson, A. Strahan, J. Sewell, R. Faulder, G. and W. Nicol, T. Payne, G. and J. Robinson, W. Lowndes, G. Wilkie, J. Mathews, P. McQueen, Ogilvy and Son, J. Scatcherd, J. Walker, Vernor and Hood, R. Lea, Darton and Harvey, J. Nunn, Lackington and Company, D. Walker, Clarke and Son, G. Kearsley, C. Law, J. White, Longman and Rees, Cadell, Jun. and Davies, J. Barker, T. Kay, Wynne and Company, Pote and Company, Carpenter and Company, W. Miller, Murray and Highley, S. Bagster, T. Hurst, T. Boosey, R. Pheney, W. Baynes, J. Harding, R. H. Evans, J. Mawman; and W. Creech, Edinburgh, 1802

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Seite 104 - American plantations, who can forbear admiring their fidelity, though it expresses itself in so dreadful a manner ? What might not that savage greatness of soul which appears in these poor wretches on many occasions, be raised to, were it rightly cultivated ? And what colour of excuse can there be for the contempt with which we treat this part of our species ? that we should not put them upon the common foot of humanity; that we should only set an insignificant fine upon the man who murders them;...
Seite 203 - Strada, in one of his Prolusions,* gives an account of a chimerical correspondence between two friends by the help of a certain loadstone, which had such virtue in it, that if it touched two several needles, when one of the needles so touched began to move, the other, though at never so great a distance, moved at the same time, and in the same manner. He tells us...
Seite 145 - Tully has therefore very justly exposed a precept delivered by some ancient writers, that a man should live with his enemy in such a manner, as might leave him room to become his friend; and with his friend in such a manner, that if he became his enemy, it should not be in his power to hurt him. The first part of this rule, which regards our behaviour towards an enemy, is indeed very reasonable, as well as very prudential ; but the latter part of it, which regards our behaviour towards a friend,...
Seite 251 - THERE is nothing which more astonishes a foreigner, and frights a country squire, than the Cries of London. My good friend Sir Roger often declares that he cannot get them out of his head or go to sleep for them, the first week that he is in town. On the contrary, Will Honeycomb calls them the Ramage de la Ville, and prefers them to the sounds of larks and nightingales, with all the music of the fields and woods.
Seite 138 - IF we look abroad upon the great multitude of mankind, and endeavour to trace out the principles of action in every individual, it will, I think, seem highly probable that ambition runs through the whole species, and that every man in proportion to the vigour of his complexion is more or less actuated by it It is indeed no uncommon thing to meet with men, who, by the natural bent of their inclinations, and without the discipline of philosophy, aspire not to the heights of power and grandeur; who...
Seite 101 - I shall make use of the same instance to illustrate the force of education, which Aristotle has brought to explain- his doctrine of substantial forms, when he tells us that a statue lies hid in a block of marble; and that the art of the statuary only clears away the superfluous matter and removes the rubbish. The figure is in the stone, the sculptor only finds it. What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to a human soul. The philosopher, the saint, or the hero, the wise, the good, or...
Seite 183 - You have not spoken in so direct a manner upon the subject of marriage, as that important case deserves. It would not be improper to observe upon the peculiarity in the youth of Great Britain of railing and laughing at that institution ; and when they fall into it, from a profligate habit of mind, being insensible of the satisfaction in that way of life, and treating their wives with the most barbarous disrespect.
Seite 235 - Irishman's thought was very natural, who, after some hours' conversation with a female orator, told her, that he believed her tongue was very glad when she was asleep, for that it had not a moment's rest all the while she was awake. That excellent old ballad of The Wanton Wife of Bath has the following remarkable lines : I think, quoth Thomas, women's tongues Of aspen leaves are made. And Ovid, though in the description of a very barbarous circumstance, tells us, that when the tongue of a beautiful...
Seite 192 - NEVEE was a man more overcome with so fantastical a passion as mine, I have painted a beautiful woman, and am despairing, dying for the picture. My own skill has undone me; it is not the dart of Venus, but my own pencil has thus wounded me. Ah, me! with what anxiety am I necessitated to adore my own idol ? How miserable am I, whilst every one must as much pity the painter as he praises the picture, and own my torment more than equal to my art. But why do I thus complain ? Have there not been more...
Seite 143 - ... principle; whose mind is so far enlarged as to take in the prospect of his country's good; who is enamoured with that praise which is one of the fair attendants of virtue, and values not those acclamations which are not seconded by the impartial testimony of his own mind; who repines not at the low station which Providence has at present allotted him, but yet would willingly advance himself by justifiable means to a more rising and advantageous ground; such a man is warmed with a generous emulation;...

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