The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart, Band 6

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T. Constable and Company [etc. ], 1855

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Seite 326 - Thou shalt not lend upon usury to thy brother; usury of money, usury of victuals, usury of any thing that is lent upon usury : unto a stranger thou mayest lend upon usury ; but unto thy brother thou shalt not lend upon usury...
Seite 307 - Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness ; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!
Seite 53 - It seems a proposition, which will not admit of much dispute, that all our ideas are nothing but copies of our impressions, or, in other words, that it is impossible for us to think of anything, which we have not antecedently felt, either by our external or internal senses.
Seite 190 - Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms, And dear that hill which lifts him to the storms ; And as a child, when scaring sounds molest, Clings close and closer to the mother's breast, So the loud torrent and the whirlwind's roar But bind him to his native mountains more.
Seite 317 - Wheeling unshaken through the void immense ; And speak, O man ! does this capacious scene With half that kindling majesty dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of Caesar's fate, Amid the crowd of patriots ; and his arm Aloft extending, like eternal Jove When guilt brings down the thunder, call'd aloud On Tully's name, and shook his crimson steel, And bade the father of his country hail ? For lo ! the tyrant prostrate on the dust, And Rome again is free...
Seite 146 - I, clapping my hands cheerily together, that was I in a desert, I would find out wherewith in it to call forth my affections : — if I could not do better, I would fasten them upon some sweet myrtle, or seek some melancholy cypress to connect myself to ; — I would court their shade, and greet them kindly for their protection ; —I would cut my name upon them, and swear they were the lovliest trees throughout the desert: if their leaves wither'd, I would teach myself to mourn ; — and when they...
Seite 165 - It is pleasant to be virtuous and good; because that is to excel many others: it is pleasant to grow better; because that is to excel ourselves: it is pleasant to command our appetites and passions, and to keep them in due order, within the bounds of reason and religion; because this is empire: nay, it is pleasant even to mortify and subdue our lusts; because that is victory.
Seite 190 - Thus every good his native wilds impart, Imprints the patriot passion on his heart ; And e'en those ills that round his mansion rise Enhance the bliss his scanty fund supplies. Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms, And dear that hill which lifts him to the storms...
Seite 316 - Is aught so fair In all the dewy landscapes of the Spring, In the bright eye of Hesper or the Morn, In Nature's fairest forms, is aught so fair As virtuous Friendship ? as the candid blush Of him who strives with fortune to be just ? The graceful tear that streams for others...
Seite 145 - Heav'n forming each on other to depend, A master, or a servant, or a friend, Bids each on other for assistance call, 'Till one Man's weakness grows the strength of all.

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