The Art of English Poetry: Containing. Rules for making verses. A collection of the most natural, agreeable, and sublime thoughts ... that are to be found in the best English poets. A dictionary of rhymes. I.. II.. III.

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Hitch and Hawes, 1762

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Seite 174 - Caesar carelessly but nod on him. He had a fever when he was in Spain, And when the fit was on him, I did mark How he did shake...
Seite 102 - The birds their quire apply; airs, vernal airs, Breathing the smell of field and grove, attune The trembling leaves while universal Pan Knit with the Graces and the Hours in dance Led on the eternal spring...
Seite 73 - And heavenly joys inspire. The song began from Jove, Who left his blissful seats above, ( Such is the power of mighty love. ) A dragon's fiery form...
Seite 259 - Look round the habitable world, how few Know their own good, or knowing it pursue.
Seite 157 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme! Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, Strong without rage, without o'er-flowing full.
Seite 179 - CHLORIS ! yourself you so excel, When you vouchsafe to breathe my thought, That, like a spirit, with this spell Of my own teaching, I am caught, That eagle's fate and mine are one, Which, on the shaft that made him die, Espied a feather of his own, Wherewith he wont to soar so high. Had Echo, with so sweet a grace, Narcissus' loud complaints return'd, Not for reflection of his face, But of his voice, the boy had burn'd.
Seite 101 - With mazy error under pendent shades Ran nectar, visiting each plant, and fed Flowers worthy of Paradise, which not nice Art In beds and curious knots, but Nature boon Pour'd forth profuse on hill, and dale, and plain...
Seite 100 - So on he fares, and to the border comes Of Eden, where delicious Paradise, Now nearer, crowns with her enclosure green...
Seite 269 - Ohy woman! lovely woman! nature made thee .To temper man : we had been brutes without you. Angels are painted fair, to look like you : There's in you all that we believe of Heaven, Amazing brightness, purity, and truth, Eternal joy, and everlasting love.
Seite 239 - Nor was his name unheard or unadored In ancient Greece ; and in Ausonian land Men called him Mulciber ; and how he fell From heaven, they fabled, thrown by angry Jove Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star...

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