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FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS

WITH

SOME SUGGESTIONS FOR CORRELATION

WITH COMPOSITION

EDITED BY

MARGARET ASHMUN, M. A.
Instructor in English in the University of Wisconsin

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EducT 799.10.165

JAR 1942

COPYRIGHT, 1910, BY HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY
COPYRIGHT, 1906, BY SUSAN LEE WARNER

COPYRIGHT, 1906, BY ALICE BROWN

COPYRIGHT, 1894, BY JOHN BURROUGHS
COPYRIGHT, 1893, BY THOMAS BAILEY ALDRICH

COPYRIGHT, 1886, BY SARAH ORNE JEWETT
COPYRIGHT, 1878, BY CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER

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Acknowledgment for kind permission to use ex-
tracts from the writings of Robert Louis Stevenson
is due to Messrs. Charles Scribner's Sons; of
Washington Irving, to Messrs. G. P. Putnam's
Sons; of Francis Parkman, to Messrs. Little,
Brown, and Company.

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INTRODUCTION

Aims in

It has long been recognized that the three important aims in the teaching of English in secondary schools are (1) “ to enable the pupil to understand the expressed thoughts of others”; (2) to Teaching enable him “ to give expression to thoughts

English of his own”; (3) “to cultivate a taste for reading, to give the pupil some acquaintance with good literature, and to furnish him the means of extending that acquaintance.”? In order to accomplish these purposes the secondary-school course in English has now gen. erally been arranged to include the careful study in class of a number of pieces of literature, the theory and the practice of composition, and the reading of considerable literature outside of the classroom. Not infrequently these three elements have been considered as separate and distinct subjects, and have been so separated from one another in the course of study that there has been little or no relation between them. Under other conditions their mutual dependence has been recognized, but the difficulties in the way of providing an effective means of correlation between them have seemed so great that no vital relation has been established in actual teaching.

That a close correlation between the study of literature in the classroom, the reading outside of class, and the instruction in the principles of composi- Relation of tion with practice in writing, is desirable, Ditteront cannot be denied. The study of the thoughts

Report of Committee on Secondary School Studies (The Committee of Ten), Washington, 1893.

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