The Transactions of the Microscopical Society of London, Band 4

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John Van Voorst, 1856
 

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Seite 232 - Seriously, if we wish rural walks to do our children any good, we must give them a love for rural sights, an object in every walk ; we must teach them — and we can teach them — to find wonder in every insect, sublimity in every hedgerow, the records of past worlds in every pebble, and boundless fertility upon the barren shore; and so, by teaching them to make full use of that limited sphere in which they now are, make them faithful in a few things, that they may be fit hereafter to be rulers...
Seite 99 - The new alveoli rise with the new teeth, and the old alveoli decay in proportion as the old teeth decay ; and when the first set falls out, the succeeding teeth are so far from having destroyed by their pressure the parts against which they might be supposed to push, that they are still enclosed and covered by a complete bony socket. From this we see that the change is not produced by a mechanical pressure, but by a particular process in the animal economy.
Seite 173 - Having, during a great many years, directed my attention to the recent Foraminifera which inhabit our own shores, I venture to offer a few observations on this curious group, as Dr. Carpenter, who has favoured the Society with an interesting and valuable memoir on the subject, seems not to have had many opportunities of studying the animals in the recent state. Rather more than twenty years ago I communicated to the Linnaean Society a paper on the subject, containing a diagnosis and figures of all...
Seite 99 - Another condition may be adduced, tending also against that opinion, namely, that temporary teeth occasionally maintain their place to the exclusion of the permanent ones, which are then kept within the substance of the jaw, or appear in some unusual position. The relations as regards time between the absorption and o I shedding of temporary teeth and the appearance of the succeeding permanent teeth, are by no means constant.
Seite 168 - CARPENTEE in the chair. Geo. Bishop, jun., Esq., was balloted for and duly elected a member of the Society. The Society then adjourned to a soiree. April 25, 1855. Dr. CARPENTER in the chair. EG Lobb, Esq., and J. Le Capellain, Esq., were balloted for, and duly elected members of the Society. A paper by Mr. Farrants on Mr. Peters' Writing Machine was read (Transactions, vol.
Seite 169 - The fingers of each uncus rest upon the corresponding ramus, to which they are attached by an elastic ligament. The mallei are moved to and fro by distinct muscles...
Seite 232 - ... and moors, from river-side and sea-shore, and shut him up in close schoolrooms and narrow play-grounds, limiting his attention to abstractions, and cutting him off even in his hours of sport from those sights and sounds of Nature which seem to be the appointed food of the youthful spirit, — the more does it seem important that he should in some way be brought into contact with her, that he should have his thoughts sometimes turned from the pages of books to those of Creation, from the teachings...
Seite 149 - ... of some lichens ; the crust investing the surface of the rock, and adhering firmly to it, in irregular patches, which continually increase from the circumference, in concentric zones. This is the young state of the Corallina...
Seite 171 - ... and that the fulcrum represents the cardines soldered together. While the author maintains the connexion of Rotifera with Insecta, through these organs in their highest development, he suggests their affinity with Polyzoa, by the same organs at the opposite extremity of the scale, since the oval muscular bulbs in...
Seite 171 - The group of Foraminifera being one as to the structure and physiology of which our knowledge is confessedly very imperfect, and for the natural classification of which there is consequently no safe basis, the author has undertaken a careful study of some of its chief typical forms, in order to elucidate (so far as may be possible) their history as living beings, and to determine the value of the characters which they present to the systematist. In the present memoir, he details the structure of...

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