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PO E T R Y.

167

TO THE NEW COMEDY ON

The drsay

see you.?

In tage I squeeze him 'gainst the door, • Bad Speculation, Bet, so far to roam;
And with his back rub off the score ; • Black legs go out, and jail-birds now
At his expence we drown all strife ;

come home, For which I praise the landlord, (could That ftripling there, all trowsers and cranot do less than praise)-the land.

vat, lord's wife,

No body, and no chin, is callid a flat; Tan ran tan, tan ran tan tan,

And he belide him in the straight-cut frock For pot or can, oh! I'm your man.

Button'd before, behind a square-cut dock,
Is, I would bet, or fear to be a lofer,
Either a man of fashion,' or a bruiser.,

A man of fashion-nothing but a quiim
EPILOGUE

I'll shew you what a man of breeding is.

With back to fire, flouched hat and vulgar SPECULATION*,

Nang,

He charms his mistress with this sweet ha. Written by M. P. Andrews, Esq.

rangue; HE drama done, permit us now to What, lovely, charming, Kitty-how d'ye

do, Something about-or not about the play Come- see my puppy, '-' No, Harry, I Good subject ours ! rare times! when speculation

You're vaftly welcome you shall see my Engrosses every subject of the nation.

ftud, To serve the state- Jews, Gentiles, all are

And ride my poncy;'~' Harry, you're willing,

too good." And for the omnium venture their last shil.. • Zounds how it freezes ; Fly was my San. ling:

cho's fire ; Nay some subscribe their thousands to the Miss, would you see'--Harry I'd wish to Ioan,

see the fire.' Without a fingle shilling of their own. That's your true breeding, that's your Be this their speculation I profess

flaming lover; To speculate in one thing only-DRESS ; The fair may freeze, but he is warm all ovet. Shew me your garments, gents, and ladies We're an odd medley, you must needs confair,

fels, I'll tell you whence you came, and who Strange in our manners, ftranger in our

dress : But, sportsman like, to hit the game, I'll Whim is the word-droll pantomimic age, try, .

With tip-tops of tafte grotesque's the Charge, prime, present my glass, and cock

rage.

Beaux with short waists, and small cloaths my eye.

close cousin'd; What a fine harvest this gay season yields, Some female heads appear like stubble fields. | Belles bunch'd before, and bundled up be. Who now of threaten'd famine dare coin.

hind; plain,

The flights of fashion bordering on bufWhen every female forehead teems with

foon, grain.

One looks like Punch, the other Pantaloon : See how the wheat-sheaves nod amid the But hold, my raillery makes some look plumes ;

gruff, Our barns are now'transferr'd to drawing. Therefore I'm off-I'm sure I've said rooms;

enough. While husbands who delight in active lives, To fill their granaries may thrash their wives.

To the EDITORS of the SPORTING MA.
Nor wives alone prolific, notice draw,
Old maids, and young ones, all are in the

GENTLEMEN,
Araw.

Reg leave
blue,

month's amusing Number, to the Advice. Is a return from India.--things won't do

--If thou think the following lines worth That market's up, she could not change her

inserting, you will greatly oblige, name,

Gentleinen, No Ramramrows nor Yanghangwoppas came,

Your most obedient

Humble servant, * For an account of which, see our last,

AMICUS.

IHR

you are ;

GAZINA.

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Dec. 9, 1795

168

P. 0 E T RY.

THE BACHELOR'S SONG.
Like a dog with a bottle fakt tied to his

tail,
Like vermin in a trap, or a thief in a jail,

Or like a hog in a bog,

Or an ape with a clog ;
Such is the man who, when he might go

free,
Does his liberty lose,

For a matrimony noose,
And fells himself into captivity.

The dog he does howl, when his bottle

Then a card I can slip, and can coga

die, Can Spar like a cock, and know how to

fight fhy; For without a knock down, I can

sprawling lie, And that is the best of the sport; But I'm not such a fool as to stand at a

shot,
Nor be sent with a cursed long pistol to

pot,
With my helter fkelter, yoicks !

O domme, but that's your fort !

does jogi

The vermin, the thief, and the hog, all in

vain Of the trap, of the jail, of the quagmire

complain ; But welfare poor pugl for he plays with And, though he would be rid on't, rather

than his life, Yet he lugs it, and he hugs it, as a man

does his wife.

his clog;

But when in the boxes I get with the

tits, I badger the parsons, and bully the cits, While their wives and their daughters I

leave in the fils, And away to my kiddies resort; And when home with them I am taking

my tramps,
I knock down the watch, and I break all

the lamps,
With my helter skelter, yoicks!

Odomme, but that's your sort!
And a dashing dog I for ever will be,
If it ends in my crofling the line at sea,
Or suppose that the line should be

croffing of me,
Why my spirits must be my support ;
And if I'm at last led a dance with a noore,
With such dancing I never shall wear out

THE SECOND PART.
How happy a thing were a wedding,

And a bedding,
If a man might purchase a wife,

For a twelve month and a day!
But to live with her all a man's life,

For ever and for aye, 'Till she grow as grey as a cat, Good faith, Mr. Parson, I thank you for

that.

my shoes,

With my helter skelter, yoicks!
O d-mme, but that's your sort !

BRUSH.

THAT'S YOUR SORT!

OR,

'Ma

I'M

L

GOLDFINCH in his GLORY.

A SONG dashing dog, you may

see that I

THE LADY'S CHOICE.
am,

AN LPIGRAM.
For a sheepish flat I can queer and bam,
And as for your minxies that modelty

UCINDA's luck did spinster's grudge, sham,

While lovers twain purlu'd her ;

For while the charm'd an old grave JUDEE, They're a damper to spirit and {port; Give me but my glass, and my girl, and

A young gay sheriff woo'd her, my gig, Let me go but my lengths, and I'll run

The judge was rich, the fheriff poor, such a rig,

Papa preferr'd his lordship; With my helter skelter, yoicks!

And mammon scorn'à for cupid's lure,
O d-mme, but that's

your
fort!

Old squaretoes deem'd a hardhip.
To kick up a row, or to beat up a breeze, But Miss, whom rank nor wealth could
I never sit quamp, like a mouse in a

move, cheese;

To be by dotard bedded; But I go it and gag it, as loud as I (For if Jack Ketch had gain'd her love, please,

The hangman she'd have wedded). For piano was never my forte ; And if a fine lady should shew any fears, Said Since to love and cherifh too Why, Madam, says I, you may Itop up Was wedlock's institution ; your ears,

Judgment, may have its weight with you, With my helter skelter, yoicks !

But I'm for execution. Odomme but that's your fort!

BRUSH

SPORTING MAGAZINE;

ORO

MONTHLY CALENDAR

THE

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OF
TRANSACTIONS of the TURF, the CHACE,
And every other DIVERSION interesting to the MAN of PLEASURE,

ENTERPRIZE and SPIRIT,
For - JANUARY, 1796.

CONTAINING,
Page

Page. Theatrical Register 171 Swaffham Coursing Meeting

204 Account of the New Drama, called

Life of Dick E-g--nd The Days of Yore

ibid. The Feast of Wit; or, Sportsman's of the Comedy of The

Hall

206 Way to get Married

172
The Force of Love

208
of the New Pantomime
Cross Readings

209 called Harlequin Captive

174
Anecdote

ibid. of the Coniedy of The Picture of a Westphalia Inn Man of Ten Thousand

175

Colonel Thornton's Dash Trying for a Hare 176 Petworth Cou:fing Meeting

ibid. Sporting Trifles

ibid. Account of the Duel between Prince The Hertfordshire Hunt

ibid. Charles of Lichtenstein, and the Treatise on Farriery

177 Prebendary of Osnabruck OF Fevers in General

179

of the Duel between MaO: Hunting

180 jor Sweetman and Capt. Watson ibid. Extraordinary Sporting Performances 183 Whimsical Account of a Thinking Observation's upon Hunting 184 Club at Manchester

214 Punishment of State Criminals in

Sporting Intelligence

215 Holland

187
Annals of Gaming

ibid. New Equestrian Establishment 188 Boxing

216. Description of a Tomb, at Minster,

Casualties

217 in Kent

191

Miscellaneous Articles
Familiar Epistle to Lady Jehu

192
Ringing

219 Wonderful Operation on a Game

Feasting Cock

193 Intance of Maternal Affection in a

POETRY. Songs, Chorusses, &c. in Bear

ibid. Merry Sherwood; Soliloquy on the Recipes for the Bites of Mad Dogs,

Poll Tax; The Butcher and Hog; &c.

194 Quadruped Rope-dancer; Inscrip: Lines Extempore

196 tion ; Lives on a Hare ; a Tale; on the approaching Nuptials

Ned and Luke; Legacy of an Old of a Young Lady ibid. Friend

221-22 Account of Mr. Spillard, the cele. brated Pedestrian

197

RACING CALENDAR. Races to Experimenis un Glandered Horses ibid. come, at Eptom; Ascot; Burford; The Longing Widow

199 Stamford ;-Biidgnorth; Knutsfurd ; Observations on a Tax upon Dogs

Bedford ; Winchester; Canterbury ; Enoch Disgracad

Lambourn; Nantwich; Newton ; On Crops

Egham ; Abingdon; Lewes; BlandProstitutes, a Fragment 203 ford ; Grantiam ; Doncaiter

25-32

218

220

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200

201

202

ORNAMENTED WITH

1. Trying for a Hare. 2. Capital Portraiture of Dal, a valuable Pointer, in The Possession of Colonel Thorntor, being the second Plase of a Series of Engravings on the Subject of Hare-hunting.

LONDON:

ETORS; PRINTED FOR THE PROPRIETORS; And sold by J. Wheble, No. 18, Warwick-square, Warwick-lane, near St,

Paul's; John Hintop, at Newmarket; and by every Bookseller and Stationer in Great Britain and Ireland.

TO THE READERS AND CORRESPONDENTS OF THE

SPORTING MAGAZINE.

WE are happy in recognizing the Signature of an Antiquarian Sportfman; and are sorry to say, his Favors arrived too late for Insertion this Month; we, however, faithfully promise him a Place in our Next.

To Ch. Chester, we are much indebted for his Account of the Petworth Coursing Meeting, which he will find particularly atrended to in our present Number.

The Life of Tattersal, will be resumed in our Next.

A Man of the World may enjoy his own Opinion with respect to the Affair he speaks of: but, were he to reflect for a Moment, on the disasterous Consequences that might probably attend bis Precipitation, he would perceive, too clearly perhaps, the Impropriety of his unreaionable Remonstrance.

The Sketch of a conspicuous Character in the Green Roon, is too much tin&tured with Malevolence, ever to obtain a Place in the Sporting Magazine.

The Pigeon Fancier Mall, if possible, be noticed in our Next.

Singular Traits in the Character of John Elwes, Esq. must be postponed.

Particulars of the annual Celebration of Mr. Baddeley's Bequest arrived too late for Infertion this Month. As also the Theatrical Hum.

An Old Fox Hunter will find bis Request attended to in our present Number.

As also B. M.-Capt. Snug,--Humanitas, Little B.-Au Unpowdered Crop, &c. &c. &c.

ERRATUM.-P. 119, of our Last, top Line but one, in second Column, for Policlion, read Profesion.

THE

Sporting Magazine,

For JANUARY 1796.,

THEATRICAL REGISTER. The plot is very simple, refting

chiefly on a love tale between * This Month the Theatres have Vortimer and Adela. The fa. been very prolific in their produce ther of the lady Oddune havtions. There has been no less than ing 10 suspicion of the attachfour new Pieces brought forward; ment that fubfifts between her and viz. at Covent-garden, a drama Vortimer, promises to marry her called the Days of Vore, with a to Alrick. Vortimer (whose falively Comedy, entitled the way to ther, Lord Hastings, has been get Married. At Drury-lane, the fain in battle), for the purpose Pantomime of Harlequin Captive, of obtaining access to the object with the Comedy of the Man of of his affection, assumes the apTen Thousand. We shall fordi pearance of a deranged mind, and lay before our readers an Account under this disguise, has frequent

interviews with her, even in the DAYS OF YORE.

presence of Oddune. Alfred the Covent-garden, Jan. 13. Great, who bears equal friendship HIS Evening a Drama, to the houses of Devonshire and

of the

/

THinshecents

, from the pennor Northumberland, agrees to pers

con

Mr. Cumberland, called the Days of form the ceremony of giving the Yore, was performed for the first hand of Adela to Alrick, and be time, the characters of wbieh are fore the proposed time, does Od. thus represented :

dune the honour of a visi at Ken. Alfred, king of England Mr. Middleton with castle, where, and in the 'adOddone earl of De-}

Mr. Harley

joining country, the scene prin

cipally lies. During his stay, be. Alrick, Earl of Nor.

}

Mr. Toms ing introduced to Adela, a thumberland Gothrun,a Danila Chief Mr. Richardson versation takes place between Vortimer, son of ?

Mr. Pope

them, in which she discloses to Hastings the D:ne }

his Majesty her love for Vore Sibald, Aitendant Lord Mr. Macready

timer. The King being averse Egbert, ditto

Mr. Clermont

to any measure inftrumental in a Malvern, ditto... Mr. Hull Molio, Steward to 0.- } Mr. Thompson

marriage expressly against her dune

will, promises to pursuade her Lothaire, a Pige Mrs.Clendining father from persisting in his inOfwenz, Widow to

Miss Morris tention of giving her to Alrick. Hastings Adela, calighter 'to?

Night approaches, and the King OdJune

} Mrs. Pope while walking under the castle Danes, Warders, Servaits, &c. &c. walls, is beret by a party of Danes,

Y 2

headed

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