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Oct. 30.

NOV. 20.

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Rock, the celebrated dramatic An under performer of Drury: Irishman, is engaged to join the Lane Theatre, was rudely seized Newcastle and Edinburgh squain St. James's Street, on Friday dron. evening, in consequence of one man being overheard to tell an. Madame Banti iş engaged for other, that he was lure that man two years at the opera. In the was a conspirator ; but when an concert lipe Mara has determined eclaircissement took place, it was to oppose her. discovered, that the expression merely alluded to his identity as The Margrave or Anspach em. an actor in Venice Preferved, and barks' 12,000l., in the Italian not to any iinproper interference operaticais next season, and with in the riots of that day. When his the Margravine, patronizes Mr. pockets were emptied, they found Texier, who is to have the ma. the play of Much ado about Nothing, nagénient. and a tobacco stopper, cut out of the Stratford mu!berry tree. Mrs. Jordan has been offered

1001. a night by the Dublin Ma

nager, which she has declined. Thomas Linley, Esq. late pro. prietor of Drury Lane Theatre, Kemble, Bapojtcr, jun. Mun. died yesterday morning, at his den, Kelly, Inciedon, Mrs: house in Southampton Street, Crouch, and Mrs. Martyr, are Covent Garden.

engaged for an Irim trip next suinMr. Sheridan has parted with a portion of his fhares.--Messrs. Grub and Richardson are his bro. Reynolds has fold his Specula. ther proptietors.

tion for 300l. referring his copy Shaw, the excellent leader of right. But the usua diberality of the band, has paid 4000l. for the Mr. Harris is not expected to ftop musical management.

here. The ten lower private boxes of this theatre, level with the pit, Mr. Coleman, it is said, is to Mr. Sheridan tas fixed at the bave a thousand pounds for his price of 4000l. each, for fourteen new opera, getting up at Drucy years.

Lane Theatre, with great expence

of scenery and decoration. Mrs. Twifleton has closed her engagement at Shrewsbury theatre. The play of Vortigern is not

yet in preparation, either as to The tragic heroine at Bath is a scenes or dresses, if the manager Mis, Betterton, about seventeen, himself is to be credited. who has very hopeful powers fo! one at that age.--Her father, who uses the knock-me.

2.dovin argument A modern makes himself merry to his pupil, in teaching her to

with Mr. Kemble's collections dance, said once to her in a pas.

66 Nobody The says) kas read fon, “fink! pink! pink!" i So

them." I will, papa," the artlessly re

The public do not know

the extent and value of this great plied, “ if you won't damn.''

dramatic library

it

OLD PLAYS.

1

102

On a Digest of the Art of Driving. It consists of many hundred, his hat, at length forcibiy pulled volumes, uniform in size, by the it from his head, and threw it uppage being let into writing paper. on the stage. Mr. S. in refentWith all the contributions from ment of this rude and improper such friends as Mr. Stevens and behaviour, brought an action Mr. Malone, the cost has been against the Major for damages, 3000l.

which were awarded him with The immenfe labour of col. costs of fuit, lating the whole Mr. Kemble has gone through: at the end of each The late Mr. Faulkner, of Lin. play he minutes down the day on colo, who died a few days ago in which he read it, and a brief cha-confinement in Lincoln Gaol, for racter of the work.

debt, experienced as many vicif. So laudable a thirst after the Gitudes in life, as would furnith a knowledge of a profession is an volume-- In his juvenile state he object of levity only to light had not stability to continue to minds. Such collections illumine one profeflion : the stage first of. the darkness of antiquity, and re fered itself, but engaging with a cover tbe force and purity of manager of a sharing company, to language.

gratify his dramatic furor, and The collection of Garrick has after performing Hamlet, Gnging been the theme of learned ap: two comie fongs, dancing a horno probation : and yet, compared pipe between the play and the with the present, it is Dender. farce, he finished the night's perLet us hear no more of this jargon formanèe with Jerry Sneak, in the of derifon, by which disappoint. Mayor of Garrat, and shared 9d. ed folly attempts to blind the and an inch of candle for one difcernment of the public. It is evening's performance. - Since the best praise, to unite with exo ihat, period he took to recruitcellence in a particular pursuit, ing for his Majesty's service, but the general accompliments of from too volatile a temper, and the gentleman, and the pursuits an open unsuspecting nature, of the scholar.

with too great a confidence in

certain speculating attornies, he The following curious a&tion died in the cuitody of the theriff for an assault, we understand, was of Lincoln. tried at the late Durham a sfizes : A Mr. William Smith was plaintiff, and Major Skelly defendant. The action took its rise from

To the EDITORS of the SPORTING

MAGAZINE. a circunstance that has caused frequent disturbances at public

GENTLEMEN, places. The fact in question was Am a constant peruser of your this.--The band in the orchestra entertaining Magazine,and am of the Durham theatre were play- in my heart a true sportsman; that ing the air of “ God save the is, there is no species of sport io King,” and part of the audience which I am totally a stranger. food up with their hats off. Mr. Horses are the chief source of my Smith did not accompany them in amusement. I love to hear of the this obeisance to the notes of a performances of that noble ani. fiddle. Major Skelly, after re.mal in whatsoever class he may be. peatedly urging Mr. S. to take off It is incumbent on me and every

other

I

PUGILISN.

Sporting Intelligence.

103 other lover of merit to thank you, trotters, or having grown old ia Gentlemen for your indefatigable their daily and hard work, can exertious in mentioning every

render them and others famous thing that occurs in the Sporting for their sufferings. Should this world with such elegance and ex- letter appear worthy of your conactness, but at the same time I trust fideration, an intimation in your you will not think me impertin. next will induce me to furni fa ent, when I give you a hint about you with some anecdotes of these one diversion of sportsmen, which gentlemen, which I thall be able I do not recollect ever feeing fully perhaps in procure ; and if you treated of, I mean the “ Art of Tould meet with any thing of the Driving;" fome few anecdotes kind, an insertion of it will very have occasionally been inserted in much oblige your Miscellany, but what I am

Your humble Servant, sure would be useful and enter.

A FRIEND OF THS Ware taining, namely, a " Digeft of the Art of Driving," has been totally Oxford, November 20, omitted. Another fund of amuse

1795. ment may be drawn from a par. suance of this plan, namely, some biographical anecdotes and ex

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE, ploits of mail and stage coachmen. Indeed, when I hear every day of a Bailey*, a Franklin, vulgarly called Ginger Willt, whose horses

October 10.

A quarrel took were killed last August by light place in the Fleet Prison between ning, when the name of Dan He. bert" and James Bird, resounds time a prisoner there, and Lieut.

a Mr. Reed, who has been fome from Litchfield to London, I am, I Proctor. The difpuie took place I must own, a little astonifhed ac not having feen thein in your morning. The parties fught for

af:er supper, about one in the Magazine. You and your inge

a considerable time, and were ennious correspondents no doubt couraged very much by the perwill be able to find in different fons who were present; and at parts of the world fome anecdotes

nine o'clock in the morning Mr. which may throw light upon the

Reed expired of the bruises he Art, as well as entertain the read

received. Mr. Proctor does not eramwagain I will venture to af.

seem to be much hart. sert many famous horses

may

be traced in the coaches, famous as

Nov. 8 far as being remarkably strong fast A pitched battle, for a conf.

derable fum, was fought last weeks

at great Thornage, near Holt, in * Bailey, alias Jack Bailey, is a man re Norfolk, between Benjamin Pile, markable in the lower class of sportsinen, being famous for his bull dogs, his cocks,

otherwise young Big Ben, and and his knowledge in the art of seconding James Harmer, commonly called a man in the noble science of pugililm. He the fighting carpenter; when after drives the Birmingham coach.

a fevere contest of three quar, +Ginger Will is remarkable for keeping ters of an hour hard fighting, time without distressing his horses. He

where more valour than skill was drives the Salop mail.- Dan Hebert, well known for his excellence in hitting his

thewn on both sides, victory was açar-lide leader.

declared in favour of Harmer,

DUELLING.

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ARCHERY.

104

Sporting Intelligence.
DUELLING.

difcharge only took place, by Nov. 1, A duel was frught near which Mr. Power was wounded Gainsborough, betwren Henry in the calf of the leg, the ball Dalton, Efq. of Knaith, and passing quite through, and Mr. Captain Eyre, of Lincoln. Afier Hare's breast was grazed. Mr. anexchange of fols, the feconds, P. was brought in a carriage to Sir Jenison Gordon and Lord Surgeon Adrien's in Euftacc. William Beaclerk, ioterfered, fireet. The seconds, on this or. and a reconciliation took place; cafion, were Pierce Power, Esq. the quarrel originated about of Clogheen, county of Watera thooring.

ford, and Lieutenant Blake, ofthe Nov. 8, A duel was fught in faine regiment, with Lieut. Hare. a field near Kensington, between It was with great difficulty their Lieutenant E.W of the light interference prevented a second dragoons, and Capt. S. of the ma. discharge, and the combatants rines, both lately returned from parted irreconciled. the West Indies.

The parties agreed to toss up for the fire, which fell to Lieutenant W.

Oct. 5. The Wantage volunteers whose shot nearly proved fatal to had a grand field day, at Letcomb his adversary, as it grazed his Castle, and among the different breast. Captain s. then fired, evolutions was that of firing at the and Nightly wounded Lieutenant target, in which they distinguished W. in the arm: a second case of themselves in so able a manner, pisols were afterwards discharged that would have done honour to but happily without effect, before the most veteran corps ; after the feconds could adjust the dif. which, they were regaled at the ference, which originated in the expence of their Captain, with discusion of some military ma. an elegant dinner, in a tent nouvres, wherein Captain S. had pitched for that purpofe on the fpoken disrespectfully of a friend downs, near the Cantie, where the of Lieutenant W's.

remainder of the day was spent In consequence of a dispute with the greatest conviviality. which took place in Covent Gar. Nov.9, The three focieties of den Theatre, on Friday fe'nnight, the Lancashire Bowmen, and the a meeting took place on Saturday Broughton and Middleton Armorning, November 7, between chers, met at Chadderton, ihe Sir W. Clarke and Captain seat of Sir Watts Horton, Bart. Brock, at Hyde Park Corner ; to Mhoot for Lady Horton's and but, on some persons assembling, nual prize, an elegant gilt quiver they removed

to Bajfwater. full of arrows, at the distance of Sir' w. Clarke, who received lixteen, twelve, eight, and four the challenge, discharged his roods; when, after a complete piftol, but happily without effect: display of skill in the science of Captain Brock's pistol miffed fire ; archery, the prize was won, by a on which the ficonds interfered, great majority of cafts, by Mr. and the matter was adjusted to Thackeray, after giving up the mutual fatisfaction.

ourward circle of the target, as Nov. 22, a duel was fought in having won it the last

year.

The the Phoenix Park, Dublin, be weather was fine, the conpany tween Pierce Power, Efq; and brilliant, and the day concluded Lieutenant Mare, of the fourth with the greatest hospitality and tegiment of Irish Brigades. One harmony.

MIS

country is propitious to the sports however astonishing here, would Sporting intelligence.

105 MISCELLANEOUS.

perty of Mr. Sutton, of Honing. Lewes, Sept. 19.

ham, and Gold leaf, belonging to

Mr. Sippens, of Carlton, in NorLast Thursday a game of cricket folk, carrying fixteen ftone each, was played at Broadftreet-Green,

was decided on the Attleborough Herftmonceux, that parish against road, on Thursday laft, in favour the neighbouring one of Waldron, of the former horse, who per. which terminated in favour of formed with ease fourteen miles the latter. It was remarked, within the hour. The fuperior at the above cricket-match, quantity of dead weight which that not withstanding the young Gold-leaf carried was much agents of both parishes were present, gainst bis fpeed, which his rider not one of the female sex appear: 1 perceivinr, is hen both horses ar. ed to grace the lawn, which rived at je ai-nile stone, very proved a great disappointment prudently g14. ja. and mortification to the bucks, who attended, full primed, and in full affurance of having the pleasure farmer in Deeping-Fens, hunting

Oat. 27, a horse belonging to a of conducting the ruftic fair ones

with Dr. Willis's hounds, made a to their respective homes, on an

spring of seven yards in length evening as delightful, as that

over a three-bar gáte.

The leap; of Love and GALLANTRY.

be considered as nothing in Ire. Oet. 16, a remarkable race was

land: a gentleman at Limerick

has a horse, which about two run in the hilly road, near Gal. leywood Common : -A fagacious feet in length, clearing at tbe same

months since leaped twenty fix butcher of Chelmsford, for a con. siderable, wager, betted a little

time a hedge in the centre of more

than four feet in height. Crispin, that he could not run a mile ; shortly afterwards he bet

Early in last month, in the pa. ted a jolly nave-maker, that he could not run a mile: they agreed

rish of St. Helen, Abingdon, three to toss up, for choice of ground, persons died in one day, whole when the knight of the feel won,

ages together made two hundred and he fixed upon the spot before

and fifty-one, viz. Thomas Waite mentioned ; previous to starting, aged 88, William Stacey, 84, and Crispin and the Wheeler offered John Crutch, 79. terms to the Butcher, but he would not accept them ; accord.

Mrs. Errington, wife of the de. ing they met at four o'clock in

ceased gentleman of that naine, the afternoon, and little Crispin. Miss Broaderic, died last week, at

who was shot* last summer by performed bis race in twelve mi. Gray's, in Effex. She never over: nutes, and Old Spoke, in ten, by which the knowing butcher was

came the shock which she recei.

ved at her husband's death. completely taken in.-J. P. Scru ple and Conscience, and C. M. the Indian Chief, were stewarıls; and

Oct. 28, the driver of the EpJ. S. Knight of the Comb, was

ping stage coach was convicted clerk of the course.

at the Public Office, Whitecha

pel, in the penalty of 4os. for Oet.

19, a trotting match for suffering more than fix persons to 2001. between Smuggler, the pro

* See our Magazine, Vol. VI, p. 66: VOL. VII. No, XXXVIII.

ride

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