Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

A further Account of Big Ben.

[ocr errors]

whale begins to fail, and the

fishermen, instead of letting out more rope, strive as much as possible to pull back what is given out already : though they always find themselves obliged to yield at last to the efforts of the animal, to prevent his finking their boat. If he runs out the two hundred fathoms of line contained in one boat, that belonging to another is immediately fastened to the end of the first, and so on; there have been instances where all the rope belonging to the fix boats has been necessary, though half that quantity is not often required. The whale cannot remain long under water, but again comes up to blow; and, being now much fatigued and wounded, continues longer above water than usual : this gives another boat time to come up with him, and he is again struck with a harpoon: he again descends, but with less force than before; and, when he comes up again, is generally incapable of descending, and suffers himself to be wounded and killed with long lances, which the men are provided with for that purpose. His death is known to be approaching, when the water, which he spouts up, is deeply tinged with blood.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

of his life at that place, where he worked as a collier. Being of an athletic make, and a good bottom, he distinguished himself as a capital boxer in that part of the kingdom, in several bruising matches; particularly by beating Clayton, the famous Shropshire. man, and the noted Spaniard Harris, of Kingswood. About twelve years since, he came to London, and worked as a Coalporter at the Adelphi Wharf. The first battle he fought of any note in London, was on the 31st of Oétober, 1786, when he beat a grenadier of the guards in the Long Field, Bloomsbury. He soon after fought and beat Tring, at Dartford Brimp : in this fight they both exhibited a bottom which has been rarely seen in any contest. They displayed great art, and fought with such spirit, that Tring was quite blinded, and Ben could see but very little. This, however, was a great advantage, and Tring was obliged to give in. After this, he, in the public prints, challenged Ryan, Dunn, Nowlan, Jackson, and Towers, but neither of those heroes would enter the lists with him. The 22d and 23d of October, 1789, three very capital battles were fought at Banbury, in Oxfordshire, when the three best boxers of Birmingham were beat. The first battle was won by Johnson, against . Perrins; the second, George the Brewer beat Pickard, and the third was between Big Ben and Jacombs, whom Ben, after thirty-five minutes hard fighting, conquered. In July, 1790, a match was made for him to fight Hooper the tin-man, Ioo guineas to 80: accordingly they met, and fought, August, 30, at Chappel new ReBerkfhire,

[ocr errors]

fhire, when, after fighting 180
rounds in three hours and a half,
it was referred to arbitration,
Hooper falling 133 times without
giving or receiving a blow, which
made it imposfible to bring it to
a decision. It was determined a
drawn battle. -
The latter end of this year, his
patron, the Duke of Hamilton,
pitted him for 500 guineas, against
the famous, and at that time, un-
conquered Johnson. The chal-
lenge was accepted; the terms
agreed on ; and the time fixed
for the battle, on the 17th of
January, 1791. Never was the
public expectation raised higher,
or greater bets laid than on this
fight, (except that between Hum-
phries and Mendoza at Odiham.)
At the time appointed, they met
at Wrotham, in Kent, and the
following is a particular account
of the battle, as communicated to
ous by a correspondent who was
present: -
About one o'clock, Johnson
came upon the stage, (which was
20 feet square) with Joe Ward as
his second, and Mendoza as his
bottle-holder. Big Ben, with
Will Ward as his second, and
Humphries as his bottle-holder,
appeared foon aster: both the
champions had the appearance of
cheerfulness. The bets were 7 to
4 in favour of Johnson.
In the first round, which was
much shorter and more violent
than first rounds usually are,
Johnson fell by a dreadful blow
upon the forehead, just above the
nose; and from the effeóts of this,
as he afterwards confessed, he did
not recover entirely in any part
of the battle.
In the second round he also
fell with a blow, and the bets
became even; but in the third
round he knocked Ben down, and
then there was some increase of

A further Account of Big Ben.

[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
« ZurückWeiter »