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TRIAL at Worcester.

* - *s a , ...t Before Mr. JUSTICE HEATH, and a . special JURY. :

wake Man v. williams. MR. WIGLEY opened the pleadings. The declaration stated, that the action was brought, in order to recover, as a compensation, damages from the defendant, for criminal conversation with the plaintiff’s wife. Mr. Erskine, as leading counsel for the prosecution, then enr tered into the subjećt matter, upon which, he said, he had the honour to address his lordship and the jury. The plaintiff, he {tated to be a gentleman well known to the jury, and as standing high in the esteem of the country at large. The defend: ant, Captain Williams, was an officer in the guards, a gentlemen of considerable fortune and dis. tinétion in the county, of Carnarr von, of which he was likewise representative in Parliament, That, to an elegant and captivar ting, person, , he added a most pleasing and insinuating address. That with these qualifications, as might be naturally expe&ted, he had obtained the notice of the most respectable families in and around the city of Worcester, and, among others, unfortunately for the future tranquility of it, that in which the lady who was the unhappy subjećt of crimination prefided ; and who, till that disastrous event, united to a person the most engaging, all the amiable qualities of a tender mother, an affectionate wife, and an agreeable companion. That the moment of the defendant's introdućtion was, alas! the unhappy

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the defendant, admitted the aël of adultery proved beyond all

vol. IV. No. XXIII.

possibility of doubt; and after some well-applied compliments to the learned counsel on the Oxford circuit, for his intrusion among them, began a speech, the principal arguments of which went towards a mitigation of damages, and an endeavour to prove ... that the defendant was rather the seduced than the seducer; that not withstanding he had violated the laws of morality and religion, and consequently those 6f his country in one instance; he had risked his life to protećt them in various others; that he had bled before the walls of Dunkirk in their defence, and had been a conspicuous figure in that glorious cause. Mr. G. lamented, that he had not the honour to be known -even personally to auy of the gentlemen to whom he was applying in favour of his client; and his client (unfortumately for him) though not destitute of many of those qualities which are an ornament to human nature, being known to them only by his vices, he felt a weight which he knew not how to support, or discharge with justice to hit: self and the defendant. He lamented that it was not in his power to exonerate his client from many aggravations of the charges that had been thrown upon him by the ingenious arguments of his learned friend, for want of those letters which the honour of his client compelled him to preserve in inviolable fecrecy; and being destitute of those advantages he could not meet his oponent upon equal ground. Mr. G., then endea

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