Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

ADVERTISEMENT.

THE SECOND SERIES of Salmagundi was, it will be perceived by the dates of the papers, commenced many years after the publication of the first, and during the absence of Mr. Irving in Europe. The whole is the production of Mr. J. K. Paulding. Setting aside any other claim it may have to public notice, it is not altogether incurious when compared with the First Series, as marking the changes in style and opinions produced by the lapse of time. This part of Salmagundi, owing to particular circumstances unnecessary to detail, has been long out of print; and it is hoped the public will not think it altogether unworthy of a revival, and association with its Elder Brother.

THE PUBLISHERS,
New-York, April, 1835.

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

VOL. I.

NEW-YORK:

PUBLISHED BY HARPER & BROTHERS,

NO. 82 CLIFF-STREET,
AND SOLD BY THE PRINCIPAL BOOKSELLERS THROUGHOUT THE

UNITED STATES.

18 3 5.

[merged small][ocr errors]

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1835,

By HARPER & BROTHERS, In the Clerk's Office of the Southern District of New-York.

Anglich cellular 10-27-40

41854

TO THE READER.

PERIODICAL writers, being a sort of suspicious persons, have from time immemorial been expected to give some account of themselves, previous to their being admitted into genteel society. It seems indeed to have passed into a law in the republic of letters, that each one should commence with a sort of self-I beg pardon-autobiography, exhibiting a tolerable account of his temper and qualifications.

As an old man, I am naturally attached to old customs, and always make a point to believe them founded in some good substantial reason, though I cannot exactly ascertain what it is. However this may be, the custom which makes it necessary for writers of our class exclusively to appear before the public and make our best bow, is extremely embarrassing to a modest person, as all authors are of course. If he speaks well of himself, everybody will turn up their noses at his vainglorious vauntings; should he take the other extreme, and undervalue his qualifications, the reader must either doubt his word, or believe him utterly inadequate to the task he has undertaken. Thus may he be aptly compared to a truant schoolboy, who having

« ZurückWeiter »