The Northern star, or, Yorkshire magazine, Band 1

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Arthur Jewitt
1817
 

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Seite 200 - Which he beside the rivulet In playing there had found; He came to ask what he had found That was so large and smooth and round. Old Kaspar took it from the boy Who stood expectant by; And then the old man shook his head, And with a natural sigh "Tis some poor fellow's skull,' said he, 'Who fell in the great victory.
Seite 200 - IT wAS a summer evening; Old Kaspar's work was done. And he before his cottage door Was sitting in the sun; And by him sported on the green His little grandchild Wilhelmine. She saw her brother Peterkin Roll something large and round. Which he beside the rivulet In playing there had found; He came to ask what he had found. That was so large and smooth and round. Old Kaspar took it from the boy, Who stood expectant by; And then the old...
Seite 24 - This loop they take out with their shingling-tongs, and beat it with iron sledges upon an iron plate near the fire, that so it may not fall in pieces, but be in a capacity to be carried under the hammer. Under which they, then removing it, and drawing a little water, beat it with the hammer very gently, which forces cinder and dross out of the matter ; afterwards, by degrees...
Seite 345 - Her sorrows through the night; and, on the bough, Sole-sitting, still at every dying fall Takes up again her lamentable strain Of winding woe; till, wide around, the woods Sigh to her song, and with her wail resound.
Seite 23 - Care also must be taken that it be not too much burned, for then it will loop, ie melt and run together in a mass. After it is burnt, they beat it into small pieces with an iron sledge, and then put it into the furnace (which is before charged with...
Seite 23 - The use of this burning is to mollify it, that so it may be broke in small pieces ; otherwise if it should be put into the furnace as it comes out of the earth, it would not melt, but come away whole. " Care also must be taken that it be not too much burned, for then it will loop, ie melt and run together in a mass.
Seite 24 - ... then removing it, and drawing a little water, beat it with the hammer very gently, which forces cinder and dross out of the matter ; afterwards, by degrees, drawing more water, they beat it thicker and stronger 'till they bring it to a bloom, which is a four-square mass of about two feet long. This operation they call shingling the loop. This done, they immediately return it to the finery...
Seite 23 - The hearth, or bottom of the furnace, is made of sandstone, and the sides round, to the height of a yard, or thereabout ; the rest of the furnace is lined up to the top with brick. When they begin upon a new furnace they put fire for a day or two before they begin to blow.
Seite 48 - ... when observations have been making on the sun, to take notice of every cloud that interrupted the observation, almost as justly as they who could see it. He could tell when any thing was held near his face, or when he passed by a tree at no great distance, provided...
Seite 40 - And, though the weight of reasons cannot be taken with the precision of algebraic quantities, yet, when each is thus considered separately and comparatively, and the whole lies before me, I think I can judge better, and am less liable to make a rash step; and in fact I have found great advantage from this kind of equation, in what may be called moral or prudential algebra.

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