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ARTICLE X.

United States fishing vessels entering the bays or harbours referred to in Article I. of this Treaty shall conform to harbour regulations common to them and to fishing vessels of Canada or of Newfoundland.

They need not report, enter, or clear, when putting into such bays or harbors for shelter or repairing damages, nor when putting into the same, outside the limits of established ports of entry, for the purpose of purchasing wood or of obtaining water; except that any such vessel remaining more than twenty-four hours, exclusive of Sundays and legal holidays, within any such port, or communicating with the shore therein, may be required to report, enter, or clear; and no vessel shall be excused hereby from giving due information to boarding officers.

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They shall not be liable in any such bays or harbors for compulsory pilotage; nor, when therein for the purpose of shelter, of repairing damages, of purchasing wood, or of obtaining water, shall they be liable for harbor dues, tonnage dues, buoy dues, light dues, or other similar dues; but this enumeration shall not permit other charges inconsistent with the enjoyment of the liberties reserved or secured by the Convention of October 20, 1818.

ARTICLE XI.

United States fishing vessels entering the ports, bays, and harbors of the Eastern and Northeastern coasts of Canada or of the coasts of Newfoundland under stress of weather or other casualty may unload, reload, tranship, or sell, subject to customs laws and regulations, all fish on board, when such unloading, transshipment, or sale is made necessary as incidental to repairs, and may replenish outfits, provisions and supplies damaged or lost by disaster; and in case of death or sickness shall be allowed all needful facilities, including the shipping of crews.

Licenses to purchase in established ports of entry of the aforesaid coasts of Canada or of Newfoundland, for the homeward voyage, such provisions and supplies as are ordinarily sold to trading vessels, shall be granted to United States fishing vessels in such ports, promptly upon application and without charge; and such vessels, having obtained licenses in the manner aforesaid, shall also be accorded upon all occasions such facilities for the purchase of casual or needful provisions and supplies as are ordinarily granted to the trading vessels; but such provisions or supplies shall not be obtained by barter, nor purchased for re-sale or traffic.

ARTICLE XII.

Fishing vessels of Canada and Newfoundland shall have on the Atlantic coast of the United States all the privileges reserved and secured by this Treaty to United States fishing vessels in the aforesaid waters of Canada and Newfoundland.

ARTICLE XIII.

The Secretary of the Treasury of the United States shall make regulations providing for the conspicuous exhibition by every United States fishing vessel, of its official number on each bow; and any such vessel, required by law to have an official number, and failing to comply with such regulations, shall not be entitled to the licenses provided for in this Treaty.

Such regulations shall be communicated to Her Majesty's Government previously to their taking effect.

ARTICLE XIV.

The penalties for unlawfully fishing in the waters, bays, creeks, and harbors, referred to in Article I of this Treaty, may extend to forfeiture of the boat or vessel, and appurtenances, and also of the supplies and cargo aboard when the offense was committed; and for preparing in such waters to unlawfully fish therein, penalties shall be fixed by the court, not to exceed those for unlawfully fishing; and for any other violation of the laws of Great Britain, Canada, or Newfoundland relating to the right of fishery in such waters, bays, creeks, or harbors, penalties shall be fixed by the court, not exceeding in all three dollars for every ton of the boat or vessel concerned. The boat or vessel may be holden for such penalties and forfeitures.

The proceedings shall be summary and as inexpensive as practicable. The trial (except on appeal) shall be at the place of detention, unless the judge shall, on request of the defense, order it to be held at some other place adjudged by him more convenient. Security for costs shall not be required of the defense, except when bail is offered. Reasonable bail shall be accepted. There shall be proper appeals available to the defense only; and the evidence at the trial may be used on appeal.

Judgments of forfeiture shall be reviewed by the Governor-General of Canada in Council, or the Governor in Council of Newfoundland, before the same are executed.

ARTICLE XV.

Whenever the United States shall remove the duty from fish-oil, whale-oil, seal-oil, and fish of all kinds (except fish preserved in oil), being the produce of fisheries carried on by the fishermen of Canada and Newfoundland, including Labrador, as well as from the usual and necessary casks, barrels, kegs, cans, and other usual and necessary coverings containing the products above mentioned, the like products, being the produce of fisheries carried on by the fishermen of the United States, as well as the usual and necessary coverings of the same, as above described, shall be admitted free of duty into the Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland.

And upon such removal of duties, and while the aforesaid articles are allowed to be brought into the United States by British subjects. without duty being reimposed thereon, the privilege of entering the ports, bays, and harbors of the aforesaid coasts of Canada and New

foundland shall be accorded to United States fishing vessels by annual licenses, free of charge, for the following purposes, namely: 1. The purchase of provisions, bait, ice, seines, lines, and all other supplies and outfits;

2. Transshipment of catch, for transport by any means of con

veyance;

3. Shipping of crews.

Supplies shall not be obtained by barter, but bait may be so obtained.

The like privileges shall be continued or given to fishing vessels of Canada and of Newfoundland on the Atlantic coasts of the United States.

ARTICLE XVI.

This Treaty shall be ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate; and by Her Britannic Majesty, having received the assent of the Parliament of Canada and of the Legislature of Newfoundland; and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible. In faith whereof, We, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed this Treaty, and have hereunto affixed our seals.

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Done in duplicate, at Washington, this fifteenth day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight.

[SEAL.]

SEAL.

T. F. BAYARD.

WILLIAM L. PUTNAM,
JAMES B. ANGELL.
J. CHAMBERLAIN.
L. S. SACKVILLE WEST.
CHARLES TUPPER.

SEAL.

SEAL.]

[SEAL.]

SEAL.]

No. 29.-1891: Unratified Convention between Great Britain and the United States of America for the Improvement of Commercial Relations between the United States and Her Britannic Majesty's Colony of Newfoundland.

The Governments of Great Britain and the United States desiring to improve the commercial relations between the United States and Her Britannic Majesty's Colony of Newfoundland, have appointed as their respective Plenipotentiaries, and given them full powers to treat of and conclude such convention, that is to say:

Her Britannic Majesty on her part has appointed Sir Julian Pauncefote; and the President of the United States has appointed on the part of the United States James G. Blaine, Secretary of State. And the said Plenipotentiaries, after having exchanged their full powers, which were found to be in due and proper form have agreed to and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

United States fishing vessels entering the waters of Newfoundland shall have the privilege of purchasing herring, caplin, squid, and

other bait fishes, at all times on the same terms and conditions, and subject to the same penalties in all respects as Newfoundland vessels.

They shall also have the privilege of touching and trading, selling fish and oil, and procuring supplies in Newfoundland, conforming to the harbor regulations, but without other charge than the payment of such light, harbor, and Customs dues as are or may be levied on Newfoundland fishing vessels.

ARTICLE II.

Dry codfish, cod oil, seal oil, sealskins, herrings, salmon, trout and salmon trout, lobsters, cod roes, tongues, and sounds, the product of the fisheries of Newfoundland, shall be admitted into the United States free of duty. Also all hogsheads, barrels, kegs, boxes, or tin cans, in which the articles above named may be carried, shall be admitted free of duty. It is understood, however, that "green" codfish are not included in the provisions of this Article.

ARTICLE III.

The officer of the Customs at the Newfoundland port where a vessel laden with the articles named in Article II clears shall give to the master of said vessel a sworn certificate that the fish shipped were taken in the waters of Newfoundland; which certificate shall be countersigned by the Consul or Consular Agent of the United States, and delivered to the proper officer of Customs at the port of destination in the United States.

ARTICLE IV.

When this convention shall come into operation, and during the continuance thereof, the duties to be levied and collected upon the following enumerated merchandise imported into the Colony of Newfoundland from the United States shall not exceed the following amounts, viz:

Flour.

Pork__

Bacon and hams, tongues, smoked beef and sausage__24

Beef, pigs' heads, hocks, and feet, salted or cured...

Indian meal_.._

Peas_

Oatmeal

Bran, Indian corn, and rice..

Salt (in bulk) –

Kerosene oil_.

25 cents per barrel.

14 cents per lb.

cents per lb. or $2.50 per 112 lbs.

cent per lb.

25 cents per barrel.

30 cents per barrel.

30 cents per barrel of 200 lbs.

12 per cent. ad valorem. 20 cents per ton of 2,240 lbs. 6 cents per gallon.

And the following articles imported free from the Colony of Newfoundland from the United States shall be admitted free

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of duty:

Agricultural implements and machinery imported by agricultural societies for the promotion of agriculture.

Crushing mills for mining purposes.

Raw cotton.

Corn for the manufacture of brooms.

Gas engines, when protected by patent.
Ploughs and harrows.

Reaping, raking, ploughing, potato-digging and seed-sowing machines to be used in the colony.

Printing presses and printing types.

ARTICLE V.

It is understood that if any reduction is made by the Colony of Newfoundland, at any time during the term of this convention, in the rates of duty upon the articles named in Article IV of this convention, the said reduction shall apply to the United States.

ARTICLE VI.

The present convention shall take effect as soon as the laws required to carry it into operation shall have been passed by the Congress of the United States on the one hand, and by the Imperial Parliament of Great Britain and the Provincial Legislature of Newfoundland on the other hand. Such assent having been given, the convention shall remain in force for five years from the date at which it may come into operation, and further, until the expiration of twelve months after either of the high contracting Parties shall give notice to the other of its wish to terminate the same; each of the high contracting parties being at liberty to give such notice to the other at the end of the said term of five years, or at any time afterwards.

ARTICLE VII.

This convention shall be duly ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by Her Britannic Majesty; and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington on the 1st day of February, 1891, or as soon thereafter as practicable.

In faith whereof, we, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed this convention and have hereunto affixed our seals.

Done in duplicate, at Washington, this day of year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and

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No. 30.-1902, November 8: Unratified Convention between Great Britain and the United States of America for the Improvement of Commercial Relations between the United States and His Britannic Majesty's Colony of Newfoundland.

The Governments of Great Britain and the United States, desiring to improve the commercial relations between the United States and His Britannic Majesty's Colony of Newfoundland, have appointed as their respective Plenipotentiaries, and given them full powers to treat of and conclude such Convention, that is to say:

His Britannic Majesty, on his part, has appointed the Right Honourable Sir Michael Herbert, K.C.M.G., C.B., His Britannic Majesty's Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary at Washing

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