Memoirs of the Marquis of Montrose, Band 1

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T. G. Stevenson, 1856 - 906 Seiten
 

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Seite 286 - I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled ; for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar : his hat was without a hatband. His stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side ; his countenance swollen and reddish; his voice sharp and untunable ; and his eloquence full of fervour, for the subject-matter...
Seite 372 - I'll never love thee more. As Alexander I will reign, And I will reign alone ; My thoughts did evermore disdain A rival on my throne. He either fears his fate too much, Or his deserts are small, That dares not put it to the touch, To gain or lose it all.
Seite 372 - I will reign and govern still, And always give the law, And have each subject at my will, And all to stand in awe ; But 'gainst my batteries if I find Thou kick, or vex me sore, As that thou set me up a blind, I'll never love thee more.
Seite 372 - I'll make thee glorious by my pen And famous by my sword ; I'll serve thee in such noble ways Was never heard before ; I'll crown and deck thee all with bays, And love thee more and more.
Seite 35 - In mental cultivation Scotland had an indisputable superiority. Though that kingdom was then the poorest in Christendom, it already vied in every branch of learning with the most favoured countries. Scotsmen...
Seite 100 - That bishops have a competence," he wrote, " is agreeable to the law of God and man ; but to invest them into great estates and principal...
Seite 372 - And when that tracing goddess Fame From east to west shall flee, She shall record it, to thy shame, How thou hast loved me ; And how in odds our love was such As few have been before ; Thou loved too many, and I too much, So I can love no more.
Seite 90 - English, and so discountenanced and slighted the Scottish nation, that, were it not for doing good service for his country, which the King intended to reduce to the form of a province, he could not suffer the indignities which were put upon him. This done he repairs unto -the King, tells him of the Earl's return from France, and of his purpose to attend him at the time appointed, but that he was so powerful, so popular, and of such esteem among the Scots, by reason of an old descent from the royal...
Seite 286 - I came one morning into the house well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled, for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor. His linen was plain, and not very clean ; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar : his hat was without a hat-band ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close...
Seite 138 - Names are easily collected. One man signs because he hates the papists ; another because he has vowed destruction to the turnpikes; one because it will vex the parson ; another because he owes his landlord nothing; one because he is rich ; another because he is poor ; one to show that he is not afraid, and another to show that he can write.

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