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the kind, commonplace neighbourly faces, small bird, of common dun-coloured apwhose presence she could command, had pearance, belonging to some hardy species, the power to dissipate it, began to feel that uninfluenced by the hardship of life and the she must have some change of scene if she severity of the season, was chirping loudly, was to carry out, even for a time, her moth- on the extreme edge of the lowest bough er's wish that she should fill her place in of the ash-tree; without a sorrow in his * the Gift.' That she would be permitted song, or a winter in his year.' to do so, she knew. Her capacity, her While she waited for the answer to her zeal, and her steadiness were so well known letter, Alice's spirits, wayward and uncerthat the authorities had consented to waive tain now, with the variations in her health, the objection of her youth. Her mother sunk again, and the agitation and restlesshad left her all she possessed, the savings ness she betrayed would bave been painful of years of toil — a small sum, as those to witness if any loving eyes had been there who have always possessed it estimate to see them. But the only eyes which had money, but enough to keep her from want, ever watched Alice with observant love if employment failed her.

were forever closed; and the girl watched, The doctor who had attended her mother and waited, and suffered alone. She had was interested in Alice, and urged her to only the vaguest notions of what form her seek change of scene. None of their few lover's advice to her would take ; it had never acquaintance were aware of the utter isola- remotely occurred to her that the tone of tion of the widow and her child, and the her letter was such as to put him into aldoctor had no notion of the difficulties in most the necessity of asking her to marry the way of his advice being acted on. Her him at once, though to any third party this own feelings, the growing helplessness which would have been apparent. It was thereoppressed her, the fear of her health break- fore without the least suspicion of its coning down, though powerful and present tents, without the slightest thrill of doubt, with her, could not conquer the timidity and or any feeling but relief and pleasure, that the reticence of Alice's nature. The girl Alice opened her lover's letter and perused could not bring herself to tell these kind the first sentences, expressive of the warmstrangers that she possessed no friends, that est affection and sympathy. But as she the only tie which now united her to her read on, her eyes dilated, her cheek flushed, kind, existed between her and a young man her breath came short and hurriedly. to whom she hoped in time to be married. For Henry Hurst asked – or rather, so Alice did the only thing which, under the little of counsel, so much of command was circumstances, she could do, - she wrote to there in his letter, required - Alice to marHenry Hurst, and asked his advice. Her ry him at once, as soon as he could make letter was the most explicit, as regarded the necessary arrangements. He dwelt herself, she had ever written to him, and upon her solitude, upon its effect upon her expressed, more strongly than she had ever health, and the uselessness of her leaving yet put it in words, the complete depend- Coventry to go among strangers with any ence and unwavering trust she felt in him, bope of deriving benefit from the change. the calm, uninterrupted sense of identity Then he pleaded his own cause, and hers, with the beloved one, which is the highest with her. He could not come to her, would and holiest interpretation of love, but which have no right to come if he could, and would cannot be entertained without some scruple, but render her position difficult and equivofear, or misgiving, by any mind less per- cal if he did, or if any one who knew them fectly preserved from contact with the world could associate him in any way with her, than was that of Alice Wood.

as her mother had unhappily died without The day on which Alice's letter was writ- recognising his right to constitute himself ten was the first in that year on which the the arbiter of her destiny. In all the world grip which winter had laid on the earth was she had only him to care for and consult relaxed, and the relief which the writing it and live for, and he only her. Why should occasioned her made itself felt physically. she not become his wife now, when his love She went out and walked in the clear air, and protection, his society and care, were and noticed the innumerable changes in the more than ever precious and needful to her, face of Nature, invisible except to those and when the old life had entirely passed who loved it as she loved it, and were wont away? With many urgent words of love, so to study it. She went into the church with ardent protestations, he pleaded with yard on her way back to the house, and the the girl, and her own heart, full of love and snow lay no longer on her mother's grave. loneliness, eagerly seconded his prayer. Some tender, tiny shoots of green were He would not urge her, he said, to anything showing above the bare brown sods, and a which might seem to her sensitiveness like

disrespect to her mother's memory; what | letter caused Alice to feel, the pain which this of disrespect could there be in their quiet peremptory direction gave her was keen – marriage, and beginning of their humble, keen when she first read it; before she had tranquil, laborious life together? Her moth- fully realised all the proposition made to er had most desired her welfare, her happi- her signified and included — when she felt it ness; had she any doubt that thus they with merely a remorseful pang at the seemwould be secured? Would she withdraw ing ingratitude of which obedience must the trust she had placed in him, the love make her guilty. She had not seen Mr. Elshe had given him, the promise on which he iot Foster for several years, but she rememhad lived so long? After much eloquent bered his kindness to her in her childhood; and passionate argument, he proceeded to and she knew that from the time of her take her consent for granted, and to give father's death until she and her mother her directions about her movements. went to Coventry, he had been their only

He laid great stress upon his wish that friend. Distant as the kinship was, too. Alice should break off all communication he was the only relative, so far as she was with Coventry, and all connection with her aware, remaining to her; and there was former life. Not that he was ashamed of it, something dreary in the feeling of utterly far from that; but he hoped and intended renouncing him. Under all this, there was to acquire for her the position in life for the gentle girl's natural shrinking from the which her beauty, her grace, and her good- dimly-seen trait in her lover's disposition ness fitted her so well; and he preferred which this requirement indicated. that nothing of the origin of either of them How long Alice hesitated about acquishould be known to his present or future as- escing in Henry Hurst's wishes, about yieldsociates. He wished that she should take ing implicit obedience to his commands – leave of the few persons whom she knew as or if she really hesitated at all, but did not if for a short time, merely saying that she feel in the secret depths of her heart a was going to friends in London, and should power stronger than feeling, than opinion, then send, from the address which he gave than circumstances, than even will, drawing her, and where he told her she should find her on, telling her that this was to be, must everything prepared for her, a formal resig- be - she could not have told now or ever. nation of her situation. He directed that An indefinite period of surprise, of shock, she should take with her to London all her of agony, then the coming of a sense of relittle possessions of whatever kind, and lief, then security, combined with such love leave everything in order for her successor, and hope as seemed to lift her, by some without making it necessary that she should charm of magic, from the depth of grief and be referred to in any way. The minuteness desolation into which she had sunk; utter deand accuracy of the instructions which pendence upon her lover, perfect confidence Henry Hurst sent Alice, proved that he had in his wisdom and his love, the complete the faculty of knowing what he was about, surrender of herself to his guidance and disand of organising the best plan of doing posal - those were the gradations in the anything he was bent upon. He laid spe- mental history of Alice Wood, during the cial stress, in a paragraph of his letter which week which elapsed before she was obliged she read with some pain, though without the to act upon the directions which Henry misgiving which it would have excited in a Hurst had given her. less trusting mind, on his desire that she Alice experienced no material difficulty should not communicate with Mr. Eliot in carrying out her lover's instructions. Foster. “He owes me nothing now, and I There was no one to interfere with her, and owe him nothing,' he wrote; · and I do not she was evidently so much better, in both choose him to know anything about me or health and spirits, that the interest felt in my affairs. You can have no reason, now her by her neighbours began naturally to dethat your poor mother is no more, for hold- cline. On a clear, bright, frosty morning, ing any communication with him. You will when the spires were glistening, and the never need any one's assistance, I hope, in grand outlines of the ancient churches were future. If we are to be poor, and to have to defined against the cold blue of the sky with struggle, we shall be poor together, and get sharp distinctness, Alice took leave of her through it as best we can, making no one old home. She had visited every haunt for the wiser, and incurring no obligations. I days before, and passed hours in the church, am under none to him, and could not endure in her accustomed nook, where the aftereven such an offer of service from him as he noon sun in the summer shone through the might make, if he knew that your future was great windows, where the smashed remnants involved with mine.'

of the old coloured glass were patched toAmid the conflicting emotions which this gether in a formless combination which did

but prolong and deepen the effect of former thoughtful solemnity which filled the young desecration and ruin. No sunshine was girl's mind, there was deep joy and thankthere now, and the place was cold and dreary fulness in her heart. Solitude and uncerto Alice. She had no sense of realising that tainty would soon cease now, and the rethis was a final parting with all her old sur- alisation of all her dreams was at hand. roundings, but something oppressed her It seemed a little strange and sad that all heavily on this day, and made her wish that her regrets were for the inanimate things this keen trial — though she did not spare among which she had lived. There were few herself a detail of it, knowing that when she people of whom she should think long. If should be far away, such sparing would seem Hugh Gaynor had been at Beckthorpe she to her ingratitude and neglect — were over. would have seen him and told him all ; On the morning of her departure she visited Henry had not mentioned his name, and she but one memorial spot. It was her mother's never imagined that he had intended his gengrave. Alice had lured many birds to the eral prohibition to extend to him ; but Hugh place by freely-spread crumb-banquets; and was absent. she had a numerous attendance of pension To Alice Wood, her very simplicity and ers on that occasion. When should she see ignorance of the world acted as a protection that grave again? She could not tell, indeed; against the nervousness and embarrassment but she had no serious thought that it might which her solitary journey might have otherbe never. Was there to be a long and happy wise occasioned 'her. She had none of the lapse of life for her, the girl thought, before knowledge which justifies fear, and none of she should be laid there with her mother, as the sophistication which renders independent she had said, in the end?? Long? per- action difficult. When her mind was at all haps not. Happy? certainly. Who could diverted from the hope and prospect upon doubt that? Was she not to be Henry's which it was concentrated, she regarded the wife, and to share his life, as she had shared little incidents of her journey with pleased it when they were children, but in a deeper, surprise and interest; and at its termination dearer, more serious sense? With all the she was met and greeted by Henry Hurst.

It is not known to numismatists that more than travellers the sickly horrors of even the short two specimens of the gold forin of Edward III. sea passage." are in existence. Of these, one is in the British Museum; the other was krocked down at a sale the other day for £113.

THE speech-day at Harrow passed off very satisfactorily. Mr. Longfellow was among the visitors. The Latin essay for the Peel medal was

a lively and accurate narrative of the Abyssinian It is reported from Smyrna that Mr. Dennis campaign. One of Longfellow's poems was recited will begin operations in the tombs of the Lydian in the presence of the author, kings at Sardis, many of which have long since been rifled.

THE Italian papers record the death of Pro

fessor Matteucci. The deceased was an Italian A REPORT has been published by Mr. Macas- senator and Minister of Public Instruction; but sey, C. E., and Mr. Scott, C. E., on a proposed was better known as a man of science and a volurailway tunnel between Scotland and Ireland. minous writer on physical science, his works beThe Northern Whig adds, “Wecannot pronounce ing well known and esteemed in this country. any opinion as to the feasibility of the scheme, though the two authors of this report, after having, as they say, thoroughly investigated the matter, have no doubt as to its practicability. A QUEER little book published in Paris gives As, however, the possibility of making a tunnel the

singular origins of many modern men of talfrom Dover to Calais has been seriously thought ent. Halevy's father was a grocer; Rossini is the of, it is not altogether unnatural that there should son of strolling players; Verdi, of an innkeeper; be a proposition to make a railway tunnel to Auber was born behind a printshop; and the join Scotland and Ireland, and save squeamish parents of Victor Masse sold nails.

disrespect to her mother's memory; what | letter caused Alice to feel, the pain which this of disrespect could there be in their quiet peremptory direction gave her was keen , marriage, and beginning of their humble, keen when she first read it; before she had tranquil, laborious life together ? Her moth- fully realised all the proposition made to er had most desired her welfare, her happi- her signified and included — when she felt it ness; had she any doubt that thus they with merely a remorseful pang at the seemwould be secured? Would she withdraw ing ingratitude of which obedience must the trust she had placed in him, the love make her guilty. She had not seen Mr. Elshe had given him, the promise on which he iot Foster for several years, but she rememhad lived so long? After much eloquent bered his kindness to her in her childhood; and passionate argument, he proceeded to and she knew that from the time of her take her consent for granted, and to give father's death until she and her mother her directions about her movements. went to Coventry, he had been their only

He laid great stress upon his wish that friend. Distant as the kinship was, too. Alice should break off all communication he was the only relative, so far as she was with Coventry, and all connection with her aware, remaining to her; and there was former life. Not that he was ashamed of it, something dreary in the feeling of utterly far from that; but he hoped and intended renouncing him. Under all this, there was to acquire for her the position in life for the gentle girl's natural shrinking from the which her beauty, her grace, and her good- dimly-seen trait in her lover's disposition ness fitted her so well; and he preferred which this requirement indicated. that nothing of the origin of either of them How long Alice hesitated about acquishould be known to his present or future as- escing in Henry Hurst's wishes, about yieldsociates. He wished that she should take ing implicit obedience to his commands leave of the few persons whom she knew as or if she really hesitated at all, but did not if for a short time, merely saying that she feel in the secret depths of her heart a was going to friends in London, and should power stronger than feeling, than opinion, then send, from the address which he gave than circumstances, than even will, drawing her, and where he told her she should find her on, telling her that this was to be, must everything prepared for her, a formal resig- be - she could not have told now or ever. nation of her situation. He directed that An indefinite period of surprise, of shock, she should take with her to London all her of agony, then the coming of a sense of relittle possessions of whatever kind, and lief, then security, combined with such love leave everything in order for her successor, and hope as seemed to lift her, by some without making it necessary that she should charm of magic, from the depth of grief and be referred to in any way. The minuteness desolation into which she had sunk; utter deand accuracy of the instructions which penrlence upon her lover, perfect confidence Henry Hurst sent Alice, proved that he had in his wisdom and his love, the complete the faculty of knowing what he was about, surrender of herself to his guidance and disand of organising the best plan of doing posal - those were the gradations in the anything he was bent upon. He laid spe- mental history of Alice Wood, during the cial stress, in a paragraph of his letter which week which elapsed before she was obliged she read with some pain, though without the to act upon the directions which Henry misgiving which it would have excited in a Hurst had given her. less trusting mind, on his desire that she Alice experienced no material difficulty should not communicate with Mr. Eliot in carrying out her lover's instructions. Foster. “He owes me nothing now, and I There was no one to interfere with her, and owe him nothing,' he wrote; and I do not she was evidently so much better, in both choose him to know anything about me or health and spirits, that the interest felt in my affairs. You can have no reason, now her by her neighbours began naturally to dethat your poor mother is no more, for hold-cline. On a clear, bright, frosty morning, ing any communication with him. You will when the spires were glistening, and the never need any one's assistance, I hope, in grand outlines of the ancient churches were future. If we are to be poor, and to have to defined against the cold blue of the sky with struggle, we shall be poor together, and get sharp distinctness, Alice took leave of her through it as best we can, making no one old home. She had visited every haunt for the wiser, and incurring no obligations. I days before, and passed hours in the church, am under none to him, and could not endure in her accustomed nook, where the aftereven such an offer of service from him as he noon sun in the summer shone through the might make, if he knew that your future was great windows, where the smashed remnants involved with mine.'

of the old coloured glass were patched toAmid the conflicting emotions which this.gether in a formless combination which did

but prolong and deepen the effect of former thoughtful solemnity which filled the young desecration and ruin. No sunshine was girl's mind, there was deep joy and thankthere now, and the place was cold and dreary fulness in her heart. Solitude and uncerto Alice. She had no sense of realising that tainty would soon cease now, and the rethis was a final parting with all her old sur-alisation of all her dreams was at hand. roundings, but something oppressed her It seemed a little strange and sad that all heavily on this day, and made her wish that her regrets were for the inanimate things this keen trial — though she did not spare among which she had lived. There were few herself a detail of it, knowing that when she people of whom she should think long. If should be far away, such sparing would seem Hugh Gaynor had been at Beckthorpe she to her ingratitude and neglect — were over. would have seen him and told him all; On the morning of her departure she visited Henry had not mentioned his name, and she but one memorial spot. It was her mother's never imagined that he had intended his gengrave. Alice had lured many birds to the eral prohibition to extend to him ; but Hugh place by freely-spread crumb-banquets; and was absent. she had a numerous attendance of pension To Alice Wood, her very simplicity and ers on that occasion. When should she see ignorance of the world acted as a protection that grave again? She could not tell, indeed; against the nervousness and embarrassment but she had no serious thought that it might which her solitary journey might have otherbe never. Was there to be a long and happy wise occasioned her. She had none of the lapse of life for her, the girl thought, before knowledge which justifies fear, and none of she should be laid there with her mother, as the sophistication which renders independent she had said, in the end'? Long? per- action difficult. When her mind was at all haps not. Happy? certainly. Who could diverted from the hope and prospect upon doubt that? Was she not to be Henry's which it was concentrated, she regarded the wife, and to share his life, as she had shared little incidents of her journey with pleased it when they were children, but in a deeper, surprise and interest; and at its termination dearer, more serious sense? With all the she was met and greeted by Henry Hurst.

Iris not known to numismatists that more than travellers the sickly horrors of even the short two specimens of the gold florin of Edward III. sea passage. are in existence. Of these, one is in the British Museum; the other was kulocked down at a sale the other day for £113.

The speech-day at Harrow passed off very satisfactorily. Mr. Longfellow was among the visitors. The Latin essay for the Peel medal was

a lively and accurate narrative of the Abyssinian It is reported from Smyrna that Mr. Dennis campaign. One of Longfellow's poems was recited will begin operations in the tombs of the Lydian in the presence of the author. kings at Sardis, many

of which have long since been rifled.

THE Italian papers record the death of Pro

fessor Matteucci. The deceased was an Italian A REPORT has been published by Mr. Macas- senator and Minister of Public Instruction; but wy. C. E, and Mr. Scott, C. E., on a proposed was better known

as a man of science and a volunilway tunnel between Scotland and Ireland. minous writer on physical science, his works behe Northern Whig adds, "Wecannot pronounce ing well known and esteemed in this country. say opinion as to the feasibility of the scheme, theragh the two authors of this report, after hava ise, 29 they say, thoroughly investigated the matter, have no doubt as to its practicability, A QUEER little book published in Paris gives , bowever, the possibility of making a tunnel the singular origins of many modern men of talfra Duver to Calais has been seriously thought ent. Halevy's father was a grocer; Rossini is the it is not altogether unnatural that there should son of strolling players; Verdi, of an innkeeper; be a proposition to make a railway tunnel to Auber was born behind a printshop; and the wa Boodland and Ireland, and save squeamish parents of Victor Masse sold nails.

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