The Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe: With 22 Plates & a Life of the Author

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Scott, Webster & Geary, 1838 - 502 Seiten
 

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Seite 127 - It happened one day, about noon, going towards my boat, I was exceedingly surprised with the print of a man's naked foot on the shore, which was very plain to be seen in the sand.
Seite 170 - His hair was long and black, not curled like wool; his forehead very high and large; and a great vivacity and sparkling sharpness in his eyes. The colour of his skin was not quite black, but very tawny; and yet not of an ugly yellow, nauseous tawny, as the Brazilians...
Seite 14 - I had several times loud calls from my reason and my more composed judgment to go home, yet I had no power to do it. I know not what to call this, nor will I urge that it is a secret overruling decree that hurries us on to be the instruments of our own destruction, even though it be before us, and that we rush upon it with our eyes open.
Seite 128 - That as I lived quite on the other side of the island, he would never have been so simple to leave a mark in a place where it was ten thousand to one whether I should ever see it or not, and in the sand too, which the first surge of the sea upon a high wind would have defaced entirely. All this seemed inconsistent with the thing itself, and with all the notions we usually entertain of the subtlety of the devil.
Seite 127 - I went on, but terrified to the last degree, looking behind me at every two or three steps, mistaking every bush and tree, and fancying every stump at a distance to be a man.
Seite 110 - In the first Place, I was removed from all the Wickedness of the World here. I had neither the Lust of the Flesh, the Lust of the Eye, or the Pride of Life. I had nothing to covet ; for I had all that I was now capable of enjoying: I was Lord of the whole Manor; or if I pleased, I might call myself King, or Emperor over the whole Country which I had Possession of. There were no Rivals : I had no Competitor, none to dispute Sovereignty or Command with me.
Seite 130 - Upon this, rising cheerfully out of my bed, my heart was not only comforted, but I was guided and encouraged to pray earnestly to God for deliverance. When I had done praying, I took up my Bible, and opening it to read, the first words that presented to me were, " Wait on the Lord, and be of good cheer, and he shall strengthen thy heart ; wait, I say, on the Lord.
Seite 51 - I smiled to myself at the sight of this money. ( O Drug ! said I, aloud, what art thou good for ? thou art not worth to me, no not the taking off of the ground : one of those knives is worth all this heap : I have no manner of use for thee, even remain where thou art and go to the bottom, as a creature whose life is not worth saving.
Seite 51 - what art thou good for? Thou art not worth to me, no, not the taking off of the ground. One of those knives is worth all this heap. I have no manner of use for thee. E'en remain where thou art and go to the bottom as a creature whose life is not worth saving.
Seite 7 - I WAS born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not of that country, my father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull. He got a good estate by merchandise, and leaving off his trade, lived afterward at York, from whence he had married my mother, whose relations were named Robinson, a very good family in that country, and from whom I was called Robinson Kreutznaer; but by the usual corruption of words in England we are now called, nay, we call ourselves,...

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