The Parliamentary History of England from the Earliest Period to the Year 1803, Band 22

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Seite 395 - Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them : they shall not be ashamed, but they shall speak with the enemies in the gate.
Seite 681 - ... if I consented to sacrifice, either to my own desire of peace, or to their temporary ease and relief, those essential rights and permanent interests, upon the maintenance and preservation of which, the future strength and security of this country must principally depend.
Seite 1071 - That it is the opinion of this House, that the farther prosecution of offensive war on the continent of North America, for the parpóse of reducing the revolted colonies to obedience by force, will be the means of weakening the efforts of this country against her European enemies ; tends, under the present circumstances, dangerously to increase the mutual enmity, so fatal to the interests both of Great Britain and America...
Seite 103 - That it is competent to this House, to examine into, and to correct abuses in, the expenditure of the civil list revenues, as well as in every other branch of the public revenue, whenever it shall appear expedient to the wisdom of this House so to do : 3.
Seite 101 - ... and impoverished condition of the nation, much public money has been improvidently squandered ; and that many individuals enjoy sinecure places, efficient places with exorbitant emoluments, and pensions unmerited by public service, to a large and still increasing amount, whence the crown has acquired a great and unconstitutional influence, which, if not checked, may soon prove fatal to the liberties of this country...
Seite 419 - ... indeed, the smallest rights of the poorest people in the kingdom are in question, I would set my face against any act of pride and power countenanced by the highest that are in it ; and if it should come to the last extremity and to a contest of blood, God forbid ! God forbid ! — my part is taken ; I would take my fate with the poor, and low, and feeble.
Seite 877 - That in the rise and progress of the war he extended every act of kindness in his power to persons called loyalists and quietists, as well as to British prisoners of war; very ample proofs of which he can produce. That he was captured on the American coast, first landed upon American ground, where he saw...
Seite 101 - State, your petitioners observe with grief, that, notwithstanding the calamitous and impoverished condition of the nation, much public money has been improvidently squandered, and that many individuals enjoy sinecure places, efficient places with exorbitant emoluments, and pensions unmerited by public service, to a large and still increasing amount ; whence the crown has acquired a great and unconstitutional influence, which, if not check'd, may soon prove fatal to the liberties of this country.
Seite 635 - III. declared, in a speech to parliament, " that he should not answer the trust committed to the sovereign of a free people, if he consented to sacrifice, either to his own desire of peace, or to their temporary ease and relief, those essential rights and permanent interests, upon the maintenance and preservation of which the future strength and security of the country must for ever depend.
Seite 721 - Oh ! says a silly man full of his prerogative of dominion over a few beasts of the field, there is excellent wool on the back of a wolf, and therefore he must be sheared. What ! shear a wolf? Yes. But will he comply ? Have you considered the trouble ? How will you get this wool ? Oh, I have considered nothing, and I will consider nothing but my right ; a wolf is an animal that has wool ; all animals that have wool are to be shorn, and therefore I will shear the wolf.

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