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ger. During the whole of the evening, and util a late hour, the neighbourhood was crowded with people from all parts of the town, a ttracted to view the ruins of an edifice which had been for just three quarters of a century a scene of public amusement, instruction, and delight. They did not depart until a late hour, when they went away, each anxious to carry off some little fragment of the ruins, as a memorial of this melancholy event.

Mr. Harris was at Uxbridge at the time this dreadful fire took place. His son went to him, and by the way of breaking it to him by degrees told him that the cieling of the wardrobe had fallen in, which was an accident in some measure expected. “ Well, said Mr. H. “ that's all my fault-I was the cause of its not being repaired.” “ But that is not all,” added his son,

“ for the walls have fallen in so, that we cannot play.” Mr. Harris exclaimed—“That's back- it would have been better for cus if it had been a fire, as we might have recoveredl.” 6. Then,” rejoined young Harris, “ you have your wish--the whole theatre is burnt to the ground.” Amidst his own sorrows, Mr. H. cried—“ Are there any lives lost?”—The son, who had left town before the misfortune happened under the Piazza passage of the theatre, answered, “ There were not.” The father, then, with his characteristic humanity and generosity, exclaimed, “ 'Tis well! I can rebuild a theatre, but I cannot restore men's lives.”

A new theatre is erecting, after a design by Smirke, junr. before the beginning of next season. Our correspondent, 0. C. T. wrote to us on this subject as follows

“ I beg to remind the managers and the world at large through your Mirror, that Mr. Wyatt, the archituct, who at the age of twenty-two, built the Pantheon, which was the admiration of all Europe in its day, now lives to afford all the excellence of matured talents. From his gemius England inight expect a theatre which should rival any in the world.”

Mr. Harris has sold 50 shares of 1000l. each, the sum to be raised. They are at a premium. The new house, &c. will cost 93,000!.--the above 50,0001. and the recovery are to pay it.

The workshops of the Opera House, and the whole of the little theatre are filled with taylors and scene painters already preparing dresses · and scenery for the new house.

We shall now add some Outlines of the History of Covent-Garden Theatre.

“ This theatre was built in 1733, and first occupied by the company of Mr. Rich, the celebrated harlequin and composer of spectacles, in whose management it continued till his death in 1761, when the concern devolved upon Mr. Beard, the singer, his son-in-law. The theatre was at first built without a one-shilling gallery; but the vox populi vox Decrum soon gained this object, and the unsightly roof which the theatre presented is to be attributed to the subsequent addition of its one-shilling gallery. The performances of this theatre of course took their tone from the peculiar talents of its managers, presenting, in Mr. Rich's time, little worth seeing but shew and the prince of harlequins, and in Mr. Beard's guiding the taste of the town too strongly to such operas as have since been followed by that train of evils, of which Cobb and the Dibdins are the immediate authors. It was in Mr. Rich's management, however, that Gay's Beggar's Opera was produced, as every one of our readers must recollect who kuows that the success of that opera was said, by a kind of cross-pun, to have made Gay Rich and Rich Gay; and, that Mr. Beard patronized the class of operas, to which I have alluded, may be proved by Bickerstaff's dedication of his Love in a Village to that gentleman.

“ In 1767 Mr. Beard retired, and a negociation was set on foot by Messrs. Harris and Rutherford for the purchase of all the property in the theatre, which belonged to the then proprietors; but the advantage of having a capital performer as one of their sharers being suggested, Mr. Powell was invited to join them, and he recommended Mr. Colman as a person from whom the undertaking would receive great benefit. The proposal being assented to by the several parties, the property of the theatre was assigned in August, 1767. The conduct of the stage was entrusted to Mr. Colman; and the house opened on the 14th of September with the comedy of the Rehearsal, and a prologue written by Paul Whitehead, and spoken by Mr. Powell. Mr. Rutherford, after many disputes among all the managers, sold his share of the theatre to Messrs. Leake and Dagge. Mr. Powell died in July 1760, and his widow afterwards married Dr. Fisher, who by that means became entitled to some part of her late husband's interest in the theatre. Mr. Colman managed the affairs of the stage until the year 1774, when his right was purchased by the rest of his partners, to whom it was immediately assigned. Since this the management has been successively vested in Mr. Harris, Mr. Lewis, and Mr. Kemble, the last of which gentlemen has purchased a share of the proprietorship, and is now manager of the concern."

LITERARY INTELLIGENCE.

THE SURREY and RUSSELL INSTITUTIONS are to have Circulating Libraries, as well as libraries that never walk abroad. Lane in Leadenhall-street, and Carpenter in Bond-street, are almost out of their little wits on the occasion.

TO

THE FOURTH VOLUME

OF THE

NEW SERIES

MISCELLANEOUS PROSE.

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263

ADDRESS to the Public-

4
Age we live in

5
Anecdotes, Chinese

336
Art of Chopping Wood 83
Athenæus, Notes on 16. 77. 157.

217. 281. 339.
Autumn

210
Bayonets

222
Biography and Biographers 141
Bon Mot

292
Books

283
Carr, v. Hood, Trial

129
Castle of Indolence

74
Charity in Religion 145. 272
Classical Quibbles

154
Coats of Arms

282
Comet, New
Correspondence 64. 66. 138. 202.

266. 330
Curious Inscription - 81, 222
Defence of Matrimony

213
Devil and the Lawyers 76
Defence of Matrimony

2:3
Dictionary, Proposals fora 220
Duelling

152
Endymion 68. 139. 204. 269.332
Epitaphs

271
Got

82
Gray and Addison

341
Great Britain and Spain

207
Hair Powder

78
Heat

63
Horace

221
Home and Aristotle

12
Idyl

79
Index

389
Institution, Surrey 328. 388
Institution, Russel 11. 988

Johnny Groat's House a

144
Knighthood.-

144. 208
Literary Intelligence 63. 128.

200. 264. 328. 388
Lord's Prayer -

21
Marriage, Reasons against 275
Matrimony

71. 209
Medical Adyice

149
Milton, Voltaire, and John-
son

151
Miscellanea

22. 80
Music

283
Music, Lofft on

337
Norton, Miss, Life of 267
Poetry, Utility of

9
Portugal, History of

19
Pulpit Eloquence

343
Punishment for poisoning 222
Punning Prayers

342
Pyc, the Poet Laureat 17
Quibbles, Wetminster

13
Scott, Query to

158
Sharp, Mrs. Memoir of 5
Simmons, Life of

203
Single-stick

73
St. Leger, Mrs. Memoirs of 331
Story

268
Superstition, or the Maiden
Aunts

211
Swift's MS.

280
Topography

276
Translation

18
Venus and A donis

14
Weston, Life of

67
White, H. K.

139
Wife

214
Wor-ship

335

-

390

INDEX TO THE FOURTH VOLUME.

REVIEW

Allendale's Man of Sorrow. 34 Inchbald's New British The-
Bell, Dr, on Education 345 atre

39
Biographical Peerage 287 Macgill's Travels 165. 289
Britton's Catalogue
99 Noble's Blackheath

223
Carlisle, Earl of, Thoughts on Old Nick's Pocket Book 233
the Construction of a new

Phillips, Sir Richard, Me-
Theatre
354 moirs of -

159
Corruption and Intolerance 173 Richardson's Poems

99
Dallas's Siege of Rochelle -

235

Relics

176
Dibdin's Edition of More's Ryley's Itinerant

359
Utopia
284 Salmagundi

38
Edward's Kathleen
92 Scott's Marmion

85
Fashionable Biography 229 Secker's Sermons

353
Fox's History of James II. 25, 93.

.

.

STAGE.

321

-

Address, Mr. Kemble's 51, 253
Africans

117
Balaam Family
Barclay's Argenis

319
Bellamy, Mrs. her Beauty 58. 116.

120
Benefit

322
Betty, Master

367
Bills, Names in the

117
Blue Beard

251
Board of Management 187. 310.

376
Bon Mots

44. 106
Braham, a Philosopher 312
Bristow, Miss, in Anne Bullen 321
Bull's-eye

191
Carr, Sir John's, Farce 191
Catholics
Centlivre, Mrs. her Husbands 311
Cheats of Scapin revived 58
Cherry's Drollery 313. 376
Clapping Delegates - 376
Coincidences, or Imitations 100
Colman's Africans

117
Conduct

254
Constant Couple

312
Cook's Sir Pertinax

257
Shylock

258
Corri, Mrs. first time 188. 318
Costupie

180
Covent Garden Company 188

Covent Garden Company in the
Kings Theatre

253
Crabs, a Simile,

53
Critic, Reniarks on the 55. 56. 193
Curiosity in Shakspeare 180
Decamp, Miss A.'s Edmond 120
D'Egville's Nursery

377
Dibdin's Melo Drame

256
Dickons, Mrs. Singing 191. 256.

325
Double Dungeon

375
Double Wedding

985
Dowton's Peachum

252
Major Sturgeon

315
Dram, by Sheridan

317
Duncan, Miss, her Graces 315
Duronset

317
Dutch Concert

60
Elliston and his Friends 53. 377
's Duke

187.251
's Don Felix

248
Captain Absolute 249
-Romeo

250
-Pertinax 250. 379
- Beverly

250
-Stranger

311
-Kitchen Stuff 314. 377
-Venoni

374. 377
Examiner

105
Reply to

173
Exile

323

367

INDEX TO THE FOURTH VOLUME.

391

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Fatal Curiosity revived 57
Fawcett's Madiboo

118
Siberian Apothe-
cary

325
Fire at Covent Garden 259. 388
First come, first served 191
Forest of Hermanstadt 256
Fortune Teller

248
Free Admissions

382
Fund, Theatrical

301
Ghost revived

117
Gibbon's Toes

249
Godwin's Thunder

375
Handel's Organ

367
Harlequin's Unities

326
Home

105
Hook

315
Huckel

317
Humour

191
Humorous Losses

258
Incledon's He Cat

190
Infant Prodigy

385
Jackall

257
John Bull

371
Johnstone's Macheath 252
Johnston, Mrs. H. her inno-
cence

325. 382
Joke Spoilers

43
Jordan, or Kissing

179
-'s Violante, and figure 247
Belinda

250
-Peggy at fifty 314
Juliet, Remarks on

319
Kemble, J. P.'s Macbeth 51

Stranger 256

Hamlet 257

and Percy 301
Kemble, C.'s, Farce 56. 192
Kemble, Mrs. C.
Lewis's Venoni

373
Liston's Pedrillo

59
Mug

118
Finished Traveller 326
Liston, Mrs. unlicked

252
Love in a Tub

372
Lyon, Miss-Irene

251
Macbeth, Strictures on 380
Marshall, first time

379
Mathews's Scapin

58
Tag

120
Lacquey
Filch

252
Mathews, Mrs. Elvina 121
May, first appearance

57

May's Octavian

59
Melo Drames

256
Memoranda Dramatica.

Drury-lane 187. 247.310. 371
Covent Garden 51. 188, 259

at the King's
Theatre 252. 318. 380
Haymarket 55. 116. 191

Covent Gar-
den Company at 382
King's Theatre

122
Astley's

60. 123. 196
Royal Circus 60. 122. 196. 259
Vauxhall

122. 196
Olympic Pavilion 259. 327. 386
Mountain, Mrs. Adela 15
-Maria

318
Mudie, Mrs. first time 310
Munden's Diaper

384
Mysterious Bride

247
New Leg

378
Norton, Miss, in Portia 257
Juliet

319
Orger, Mrs. first time 249
Paul, Father

377
Pizarro, Remarks on

188
Plot and Counterplot 56. 192
Pocock's Farce

193
Polly

252
Portrait of Cervantes

52
Private Boxes

254
Price of Admission, Thoughts
of raising the,

258
Provincial Draina
Manchester

61
Bath and Bristol

62
Liverpool

123, 196
Worcester

124
Sunderland

127
Galway

198
Worthing

262
Brighton

263
Belfast

327
Rats

177
Revenge

116
Reynolds

322
Russel's Jerry Sneak 315
Save-all

327
Saving of the Board

247
Scriven, first time,

ib.
School för Authors, by Tobin 38%
Shakespeare, fresh Researches
into the History of 236. 297.

363

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318

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250

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