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great beauty, with his own Lesbia, allowing to Quintia many beauties, but denying her claim to be called beautiful.

3. venustas] 'grace.' 4. salis] elegance.

CARMEN LVIII.

Of Lesbia.
Love surviving disdain and reproaches.

3. deprecor] seems here to have not merely the force of “to pray against,' to deprecate, but also includes the notion of imprecation. So many maledictions as Lesbia utters against him, he forthwith and continually invokes on her.

CARMEN LIX. 1

On the Smyrna of the Poet Cinna. Fragments of a poem in which Catullus gives his opinion of the worth of several cotemporary writers, and of their prospects of immortality.

1. Smyrna] the name of an elaborate poem of Cinna. This was an intimate friend of Cæsar and of Catullus, (mei) Corn. Helvius Cinna.

3. Hortensius] Quintus the celebrated orator. 6. pervolvent] 'turn over,' read.'

7. Volusi annales] vide Carm. 26.

8.] for the use of fishmongers in wrapping up fish.

10. Antimacho] a native of Colophon, who wrote a huge poem on the Theban war.

CARMEN LX.

To Licinius Calvus.

On the early death of Quintilia, solacing his grief with the hope that if an affectionate remembrance by the survivors, may be grateful to the departed, the sadness of her untimely loss of the joys of life, would be overpaid by the strength and constancy of his love.

CARMEN LXI.

Catullus had gone to Troas, to pay the last, honors to the Manes of his brother, who was buried there. After the usual solemnities, he addresses the dead in the words of this poem. The love of Catullus for his brother, the only relative he mentions, is one of the brighter features in a character too deeply stained with the licentiousness of the age.

CARMEN LXII.

He commends to his friend Cornelius, his power of keeping secrets.

3. illorum jure sacratum] 'bound by the oath of such.

4. Harpocratem] the god of Silence.

CARMEN LXIII.

To Lesbia.

On the unexpected renewal of her attachment to him.

CARMEN LXIV.

On Cominius.

Whose license of his tongue, and crimination of virtuous citizens, had made him universally odious.

CARMEN LXV.

To Lesbia.

From whom he had been estranged, on her offering a reconciliation ; expressing a prayer for its sincerity and permanence.

CARMEN LXVI.

To Gellius.

1. studioso animo venanda] “to be studied with

thoughtful mind,' applied to a poem of Callimachus, obscure and full of invective against Apollonius Rhodius, of which Catullus had attempted an imitation, against Gellius.

Ovid in Ibide, v. 55. seq., in allusion to these,

carmina Battiadae,
Nunc, quo Battiades inimicum devovet Ibin,
Hoc

ego devoveo teque tuosque modo.
Utque ille, historiis involvam carmina caecis :

4.] Tela infesta meum mittere inusque caput. 1 14 50

Sillig.

7. contra] still, but yet.'

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