A General History of Voyages and Travels to the End of the 18th Century

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J. Ballantyne & Company, 1811
 

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Seite 162 - It is written in the book of Ecclesiasticus, " That the truly wise man shall travel through strange countries ; for he hath tried the good and evil among men." All this, Sire, I have performed ; and I wish I may have done so as a wise man, and not as a fool. For many do foolishly those things which have been done by wise men, and I fear I may be reckoned among that number. But as you were pleased to command me at my departure, that I should write down every thing I saw among the Tartars, and should...
Seite 8 - Ohthere told his lord King Alfred, that he lived to the north of all the Nordmen or Norwegians ; and that he dwelt in that land to -the northward, opposite to the west sea ; and that all the land to the north of that sea is waste and uninhabited, except in a few places, to which the Finnas* or Fins repair in winter for hunting and fowling, and for fishing in the summer. Being desirous to ascertain how far this country extended towards the north, and whether there were any inhabitants beyond these...
Seite 56 - Arabs is the first and most powerful of kings, the most wealthy, and the most excellent every way, because he is the prince and head of a great religion, and becanse no other surpasses him.
Seite 321 - ... the captain of a thousand has a tablet of gold or silver gilt; and the commander of ten thousand has a tablet of gold, ornamented with the head of a lion. These tablets differ in size and weight, according to the dignity of the wearers. On each tablet there is an inscription of the following import: "By the strength and power of the Almighty God, and by the grace which He hath given to our empire: Let the name of the great khan be blessed, and let all die or be destroyed who will not obey his...
Seite 79 - Mehrage, stands on a river as broad as the Tigris at Bagdat or Bassora, but the sea intercepts its course, and drives its waters back with the tide ; yet during the ebb the fresh water flows out a good way into the sea. The river water is let into a small pond, close to the king's palace, and every morning the master of the household brings an ingot of gold, wrought in a particular manner, and throws it into the pond, in presence of the king.
Seite 49 - Delarowi there are many islands, said to be in number 1900, which divide those two seas from each other*, and are governed by a queen 3 . Among these islands they find ambergris in lumps of extraordinary bigness, and also in smaller pieces, which resemble plants torn up. This amber is produced at the bottom of the sea, in the same manner as plants are produced upon the earth; and when the sea is tempestuous, it is torn up from the bottom by the violence of the waves, and washed to the shore in the...
Seite 96 - In it is the magnificent temple of St Sophia, where dwells the patriarch of the Greeks, who do not agree in doctrine with the pope of Rome. This temple contains as many altars as there are days in the year, and it has a revenue beyond all estimation great, from the offerings and riches brought continually from divers countries, islands, forts, castles, and places,. so that the wealth of no other temple on earth can be compared to the riches which it contains. In the middle of this temple there are...
Seite 71 - ... the ancient usages ; so that our merchants were forced to return in crowds to Siraff and Oman *. The punishment of married persons, convicted of adultery, as well as for the crimes of homicide and theft, is as follows : The hands are bound fast together, and forced backwards over the head, till they rest on the neck. The right foot is then fastened to the right hand, and the left foot to the left hand, and all drawn tight together behind the back, so that the criminal is incapable to stir; and...
Seite 120 - Cracow were obliterated ; they approached the shores of the Baltic, and in the battle of Lignitz they defeated the dukes of Silesia, the Polish palatines, and the great master of the Teutonic order, and filled nine sacks with the right ears of the slain.
Seite 269 - Venice, they were entirely forgotten ten by their relations and former acquaintances, and had considerable difficulty to establish their identity, and to get themselves recognized by their family, and were obliged to use extraordinary means to recover the respect which was their due, and an acknowledgement of their name, family, and rank, the particulars of which will be found in the travels themselves. About three years after the return of these adventurous travellers, hostilities arose between...

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