History of Great Britain, from the Revolution, 1688, to the Concluding of the Treaty of Amiens, 1802, Band 8

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Seite 344 - ... there can be but one supreme power, which is the legislative, to which all the rest are and must be subordinate, yet the legislative being only a fiduciary power to act for certain ends, there remains still in the peoples supreme power to remove or alter the legislative when they find the legislative act contrary to the trust reposed in them...
Seite 416 - If we listen to the voice of reason and duty, and pursue this night the line of conduct which they prescribe, some of us may live to see a reverse of that picture, from which we now turn our eyes with shame and regret.
Seite 293 - The right to property being inviolable and sacred, no one ought to be deprived of it, except in cases of evident public necessity, legally ascertained, and on condition of a previous just indemnity.
Seite 559 - I beg leave to add, that their ideas are formed on the supposition that his Majesty's illness is only temporary, and may be of no long duration. It may be difficult to fix, beforehand, the precise period for which...
Seite 292 - X. No man ought to be molested on account of his opinions, not even on account of his religious opinions, provided his avowal of them does not disturb the public order established by the law.
Seite 341 - is almost the only lawful king in the world, because the only one who owes his crown to the choice of his people.
Seite 350 - When it shall be said in any country in the world, my poor are happy: neither ignorance nor distress is to be found among them; my jails are empty of prisoners, my streets of beggars; the aged are not in want, the taxes are not oppressive; the rational world is my friend, because I am the friend of its happiness: when these things can be said, then may that country boast of its constitution and its government.
Seite 295 - I have lived to see the rights of men better understood than ever, and nations panting for liberty which seemed to have lost the idea of it. I have lived to see thirty millions of people indignant and resolute, spurning at slavery, and demanding liberty with an irresistible voice, their king led in triumph, and an arbitrary monarch surrendering himself to his subjects.
Seite 563 - Upon that part of the plan which regards the King's real and personal property, the prince feels himself compelled to remark, that it was not necessary for Mr. Pitt, nor proper, to suggest to the prince, the restraint he proposes against the prince's granting away the King's real and personal property.
Seite 219 - Highness understood too well the sacred principles which seated the house of Brunswick on the throne of Great Britain, ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives, and their lordships in parliament assembled.

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