Hudibras: Poëme, Band 3

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Seite 34 - Emperor Caligula, That triumph'd o'er the British sea, Took crabs and oysters prisoners, And lobsters, 'stead of cuirassiers ; Engag'd his legions in fierce bustles, With periwinkles, prawns, and muscles. And led his troops with furious gallops, To charge whole regiments of scallops ; Not like their ancient way of war, To wait on his triumphal car ; But when he went to dine or sup, More bravely ate his captives up, And left all war, by his example, Reduc'd to vict'ling of a camp well.
Seite 50 - Who, when a thief has robb'd his house, Applies himself to cunning men, To help him to his goods again ; When all he can expect to gain, Is but to squander more in vain : And yet I have no other way, But is as difficult, to play : For to reduce her, by main force, Is now in vain ; by fair means...
Seite 186 - O' th' compass in their bones and joints, Can by their pangs and aches find All turns and changes of the wind, And better than by Napier's bones Feel in their own the age of moons...
Seite 210 - Th' hotter th' are they grow the stiffer ; Still setting off their spiritual goods, With fierce and pertinacious feuds : For zeal's a dreadful termagant, That teaches saints to tear and rant, And independents to profess The doctrine of dependences...
Seite 58 - Like nest-eggs to make clients lay, And for his false opinion pay : To whom the Knight, with comely grace, Put off his hat, to put his...
Seite 138 - We rule in every public meeting, And make men do what we judge fitting ; Are magistrates in all great towns, Where men do nothing but wear gowns. We make the man of war...
Seite 170 - Next him his son and heir apparent Succeeded, though a lame vicegerent ; Who first laid by the parliament, The only crutch on which he leant; And then sunk underneath the state, That rode him above horseman's weight.
Seite 4 - But merely in th' imagination, And yet can do more dreadful feats Than hags, with all their imps and teats ; Make more "bewitch and haunt themselves, Than all their nurseries of elves. For fear does things so like a witch, 'Tis hard t...
Seite 180 - Nor what to give, but what to take ; To feel the Pulfes of their Fees, More wife than fumbling Arteries ; Prolong the Snuff of Life in pain, And from the Grave recover - — Gain.
Seite 182 - Mong these there was a politician* With more heads than a beast in vision, And more intrigues in every one Than all the Whores of Babylon ; So politic, as if one eye Upon the other were a spy, That, to trepan the one to think The other blind, both strove to blink ; And in his dark pragmatic way As busy as a child at play.

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