The works of Samuel Johnson [ed. by F.P. Walesby].

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W. Pickering, London; and Talboys and Wheeler, Oxford, 1825
 

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The necessity of proportioning punishments to crimes
39
The sequel of Hymenæuss courtship
44
The young traders attempt at politeness
49
The advantages of living in a garret
54
The narrowness of fame
60
Tranquillas account of her lovers opposed to Hymenæus
64
The history of Almamoulin the son of Nouradin
70
The dangers of imitation The impropriety of imitating Spenser
75
A criticism on the English historians
80
The young trader turned gentleman
84
The ladys misery in a summer retirement
89
NUMB PAGE 128 Anxiety universal The unhappiness of a wit and a fine lady
107
The folly of cowardice and inactivity
111
The history of a beauty
116
Desire of gain the general passion
119
The difficulty of defining comedy Tragick and comick sentiments
125
The miseries of a beauty defaced
130
Idleness an anxious and miserable state 134 4
138
The meanness and mischief of indiscriminate dedication
143
The necessity of literary courage
147
Original characters to be found in the country The character of Mrs Busy
152
A critical examination of Samson Agonistes
157
The criticism continued
162
NUMB PAGE 165 The impotence of wealth The visit of Scrotinus to the place of
165
The danger of attempting wit in conversation The character of Papilius
168
An account of squire Bluster
173
The criterions of plagiarism
178
The difficulty of raising reputation The various species of de tractors
184
Petty writers not to be despised
188
An account of an author travelling in quest of his own character The uncertainty of fame
192
The courtiers esteem of assurance
196
confounded 93
201
NUMB PAGE 203 The pleasures of life to be sought in prospects of futurity Future
203
Benefits not always entitled to gratitude
206
Adversity useful to the acquisition of knowledge
211
The climactericks of the mind
215
Criticism on epistolary writings
220
The treatment incurred by loss of fortune
224
The inefficacy of genius without learning
229
The usefulness of advice The danger of habits The necessity of reviewing life
234
The laws of writing not always indisputable Reflections on tragi comedy
239
The scholars complaint of his own bashfulness
243
The marriage of Hymenæus and Tranquilla
287
Poetry debased by mean expressions An example from Shake speare
291
Labour necessary to excellence
295
The history of Misella debauched by her relation
299
Misellas description of the life of a prostitute
304
The effect of sudden riches upon the manners
309
Unreasonable fears of pedantry
313
The mischiefs of unbounded raillery History of Dicaculus
317
The majority are wicked
322
Directions to authors attacked by criticks The various degrees of critical perspicacity
326
An account of a club of antiquaries
329
Many advantages not to be enjoyed together
333
The awkward merriment of a student
337
The study of life not to be neglected for the sake of books
341
The history of an adventurer in lotteries
345
The history of Leviculus the fortunehunter
350
The influence of envy and interest compared
354
The subject of essays often suggested by chance Chance equally prevalent in other affairs
358
The prohibition of revenge justifiable by reason The meanness of regulating our conduct by the opinions of men
362
Anningait and Ajut a Greenland history
367
The history of Anningait and Ajut concluded
371
Favour often gained with little assistance from understanding
375
The mischiefs of falsehood The character of Turpicula
379
The history of Abouzaid the son of Morad
383
The busy life of a young lady
387
Love unsuccessful without riches
392
The authors art of praising himself
396
A young noblemans progress in politeness
400
A young noblemans introduction to the knowledge of the town
405
Human opinions mutable The hopes of youth fallacious
409
The history of a legacyhunter
413
The legacyhunters history concluded
417
The virtues of Rabbi Abrahams magnet
422
Aspers complaint of the insolence of Prospero Unpoliteness not always the effect of pride
427
The importance of punctuality
432
The different acceptations of poverty Cynicks and Monks not poor
436
fame uncertain
440
The history of ten days of Seged emperour of Ethiopia
444
The history of Seged concluded
448
The art of living at the cost of others
452
The folly of continuing too long upon the stage
457
The Ramblers reception His design
461

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Seite 17 - What better can we do than prostrate fall Before him reverent; and there confess Humbly our faults, and pardon beg ; with tears Wat'ring the ground, and with our sighs the air. Frequenting, sent from hearts contrite, in sign Of sorrow unfeign'd, and humiliation meek ? Par. Lost, B. x. 1087. N°. 111. TUESDAY, APRIL 9, 1751.
Seite 117 - his conversations on the subject, amidst his often indulged laxity of talk, there was ever a deep insight into the human heart. " All the arguments," he once, with keen satire, remarked, " which are brought to represent poverty as no evil, show it to be evidently a great evil. You never find people
Seite 394 - soon blasted by rashness and negligence, and great designs, which are defeated by inexperience. In age, we have knowledge and prudence without spirit to exert, or motives to prompt them ; we are able to plan schemes and regulate measures, but have not time remaining to bring them to completion. N°. 197- TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1752.
Seite 151 - labour Honest and lawful to deserve my food Of those who have me in their civil power. Chor. Where the heart joins not, outward acts defile not. Sams. Where outward force constrains, the sentence holds. But who constrains me to the temple of Dagon, Not dragging ? The Philistine lords command. Commands are no constraints. If I obey them. I do it
Seite 144 - But will arise and his great name assert: Dagon must stoop, and shall ere long receive Such a discomfit, as shall quite despoil him Of all these boasted trophies won on me. Manoah. With cause this hope relieves thee,
Seite 276 - to refrain from laughter, when they who are not prepossessed by the same accidental association, are utterly unable to guess the reason of his merriment. Words which convey ideas of dignity in one age, are banished from elegant writing or conversation in another, because they are in time debased by vulgar mouths, and
Seite 90 - from our present writers almost all that dominion over the passions which was the boast of their predecessors. Yet they may at least claim this commendation, that they avoid gross faults, and that if they cannot often move terrour or pity, they are always careful not to provoke laughter. N°. 126. SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 1751.
Seite 35 - and prosecution dreaded. The heart of a good man cannot but recoil at the thought of punishing a slight injury with death ; especially when he remembers that the thief might have procured safety by another crime, from which he was restrained only by his remaining virtue. The obligations to assist the exercise of
Seite 149 - consistency is not accurately preserved. Thus Samson confounds loquacity with a shipwreck : How could I once look up, or heave the head, Who like a foolish pilot, have shipwreck'd My vessel trusted to me from above, Gloriously
Seite 164 - Before great Agamemnon reign'd, Reign'd kings as great as he, and brave, Whose huge ambition's now contain'd In the small compass of a grave : In endless night they sleep, unwept, unknown : No bard had they to make all time their own.

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