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Mr. FINLEY. Yes, sir; in fact, I conduct all of the detailed negotiations and detailed dealings between our board and the TVA. My board is a customer of TVA.

Senator KNOWLAND. What is your impression of the caliber of the men who worked under Mr. Lilienthal ?

Mr. FIXLEY. I would say very fine caliber, sir.
Senator KNOWLAND. That is all.
The CHAIRMAN, Senator McKellar?
Senator MCKELLAR. I pass again.
The CHAIRMAN. Thank you.
Mr. FINLEY. Thank you.
The CHAIRMAX. Mrs. Pauline Crumley Cox?
Mrs. Cox. Yes, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth?

Mrs. Cox. Yes, sir.

TESTIMONY OF MRS. PAULINE CRUMLEY COX, MIAMI, FLA.
The CHAIRMAX. Will you be seated, Mrs. Cox?
Your name is Mrs. Pauline Crumley Cox?
Mrs. Cox. That is right.
The CHAIRMAN. Where do you live, Mrs. Cox!
Mrs. Cox. I live in Miami, Fla.
The CHAIRMAX. What is your address in Miami, Fla.?
Mrs. Cox. 525 Northwest Thirty-seventh St.
The CHAIRMAN. How long have you lived there?
Mrs. Cox. Twenty-two months.
Senator MCKELLAR. Did you ever work for the TVA?
Mrs. Cox. Yes, Senator.
Senator MCKELLAR. When?
Mrs. Cox. From November 1933 through March 1945.
Senator MCKELLAR. November 1933 until when?
Mrs. Cox. Through March 1945.
Senator MCKELLAR. March of 1945 ?
Mrs. Cox. Yes, sir.
Senator McKELLAR. About 8 years—712 years?
Mrs. Cox. A little over 12 years.
Senator MCKELLAR, Eleven years?
Mrs. Cox. Yes,

Senator McKELLAR. My addition is wrong. Did you have a post office box at the post office at Knoxville, post office box 1604!

Mrs. Cox. Yes, sir; I did, Senator.
Senator McKELLAR. Who had the key to it besides yourself?
Mrs. Cox. Well, the girl I roomed with had a key to it.
Senator MCKELLAR. What is her name?
Mrs. Cox. Miss Capibianco.
Senator McKELLAR. Miss who?
Mrs. Cox. Capibianco, she is a little Italian girl.
Senator MCKELLAR. How do you spell it?
Mrs. Cox. C-a-p-i-b-i-a-n-c-o.

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The CHAIRMAN. Let us get the spelling of this correctly now.
Mrs. Cox. (-a-p-i-b-i-a-n-c-o.
The CHAIRMAN. Is that her last name?
Mrs. Cox. That is right.
The CHAIRMAN. What is her first name, do you recall ?

Mrs. Cox. I do not recall because we always called her Capey. But she had the key after I came to Miami.

Senator McKELLAR. She had the key to this post office box?
Mrs. Cox. Yes, sir.
Senator MCKELLAR. Let's get the name again! C-a-p-
Mrs. Cox. “;”-
Senator McKELLAR. Just one “i” and one "p"??
Mrs. Cox. That is right.
Senator McKELLAR. "b-i" what?
Mrs. Cox. "b-i-a-n-c-o."

Senator MCKELLAR. "p-i"? You are going too fast for me“C-a-p-i”

Mrs. Cox. “b-i-a-n-c-o."
Senator McKELLAR. "b-i-a-n-c-o."
Mrs. Cox. That is right.
Senator McKELLAR. I have got it. C-a-p-i-b-i-a-n-c-o.
Mrs. Cox. I think that is right, Senator.

The CHAIRMAN. Senator McKellar, I may suggest that if you had struggled with the name of Hickenlooper for 50 years you would not have any trouble over that.

Senator McKELLAR. It ought to be easy for you. Well, we will go ahead. What did you get this post office box for?

Mrs. Cox. Well, I have always had a post office box for a number of years because it was more convenient.

Senator MCKELLAR. What is that?
Mrs. Cox. I have had a post office box for my own personal use.
Senator MCKELLAR. Where?
Mrs. Cox. In Knoxville, Tenn.
Senator MCKELLAR. Yes. You have had that but I say what did

you use it for?

Mrs. Cox. For my own personal mail."
Senator McKELLAR. For your own personal mail?
Mrs. Cox. Yes, sir.

Senator MCKELLAR. You got it after you went with the TVA; did you not?

Mrs. Cox. Well, I suppose I did.

Senator McKELLAR. What would a letter be doing going to Birmingham, Ala., to another post office box of 1871 there?

Mrs. Cox. I do not know.
Senator MCKELLAR. You do not know?
Mrs. Cox. No.
Senator MCKELLAR. Have you ever heard of such a letter?
Mrs. Cox. No; I never have.
Senator MCKELLAR. Have you ever heard of such a letter?
Mrs. Cox. No; I never have.

Senator MCKELLAR. Did you ever give your key to anybody except Miss Capibianco?

Mrs. Cox. No, Senator.
Senator MCKELLAR. Never did ?
Mrs. Cox. No.

Senator MCKELLAR. Well, a letter went from this box 160— and you say that is your box?

Mrs. Cox. That is right. Senator McKELLAR. And you never let that key out of your possession? Mrs. Cox. Only the one she had. Senator MCKELLAR. Do you know what she did with it?

Mrs. ('ox. Well, she had the key between the time after the time that I left TVA.

Senator MCKELLAR. But she never had the key prior to January 31, 1939, did she? Mrs. Cox. No, Senator. Senator MCKELLAR. She did not? Mrs. Cox. No: Senator MCKELLAR. And you did not mail a letter on January 31, 1939 ?

Mrs. ('ox. I know nothing of a box number like that in Birmingham.

Senator MCKELLAR. Box 1604.
Mrs. Cox. Did you not say box 18-something?

Senator MCKELLAR. No; I say, dated January 31. The letter was dated January 31, 1939.

Mrs. Cox. And where did this letter go!

Senator MCKELLAR. It went to Mr. Robert F. Hall, post-office box 1871 at Birmingham, Ala.

Mrs. Cox. I know nothing of that.
Senator MCKELLAR. You know nothing of that?
Mrs. Cox. No.
Senator KNOWLAND. Do you know a Mr. Robert Hall?
Mrs. Cox. I do not.

Senator MCKELLAR. Did your roommate or friend, Miss-whatever her name is--did she have use of the key at that time, January 31, 1939?

Mrs. Cox. No. She did not.

Senator McKELLAR. Did you ever let anybody use your box except · Miss Capibianco? Mrs. Cox. No; I did not, Senator. Senator MCKELLAR. You never did ? Mrs. Cox. No.

Senator McKELLAR. So, you have no idea where that letter was mailed ?

Mrs. Cox. I do not. Senator McKELLAR. You have since married; have you not? Mrs. Cox. Yes. Senator MCKELLAR. You live in Florida? Mrs. Cox. That is right. Senator MCKELLAR. Did you belong to the people who were Communists there in the TVA?

Mrs. Cox. No; I did not.

98078-47---42

you not?

you not?

Senator MCKELLAR. You did not?
Mrs. Cox, No.
Senator McKELLAR. You knew some of them; did you not?
Mrs. Cox. I do not know whether I knew any or not.

Senator McKELLAR. I will ask you: Did you know Mr. John Frantz?

Mrs. Cox. I know him at sight.

Senator McKELLAR. You knew that he was a Communist; did you not?

Mrs. Cox. I did not know it.
Senator MoKELLAR. You did not know it, but you knew of it; did
Mrs. Cox. I have heard rumors but I did not know.
Senator MCKELLAR. You have heard rumors?
Mrs. Cox. Yes.
Senator McKELLAR. Did you know Mr. Hart-Henry C. Hart?
Mrs. Cox. I know him; yes.
Senator MCKELLAR. Did you hear rumors about him, too?
Mrs. Cox. Well, I heard rumors.

Senator MCKELLAR. You heard the same sort of rumors about Mr. Hart that you heard about Mr. Frantz; did

Mrs. Cox. I heard rumors; yes.

Senator KNOWLAND. Did Mr. Hart ever ask permission to use your box for return of his letters?

Mrs. Cox. No; he did not.
Senator KNOWLAND. At any time?
Mrs. Cox. Not at any time.
Senator KNOWLAND. Neither directly nor indirectly?
Mrs. Cox. No, sir.

Senator MCKELLAR. Could he have gotten it from your friend whose name I cannot pronounce?

Mrs. Cox. No, Senator.
Senator McKELLAR. He could not have gotten it?
Mrs. Cox. No.

Senator McKELLAR. Do you know when she used it what she used it for?

Mrs. Cox. She had her personal mail sent to the box.

Senator MCKELLAR. One of the reasons that seems to be unusual to me is that I have been living quite a much longer time than you have and I never used a box in my life. I cannot imagine what anybody would want to use a box for except for secrecy of some sort.

Is that what you used it for?

Mrs. Cox. No. My husband used the box, too. We had all our mail go there.

Senator MCKELLAR. Your husband used the box?
Mrs. Cox. Yes.

Senator McKELLAR. To be perfectly frank about it, were you your husband courting at the time when you and he were using this box?

Mrs. Cox. I have been married more than 7 years.
Senator MCKELLAR. More than 7 years?

and

Mrs. Cox: More than 6 years, I should say.

Senator MCKELLAR. You have been married since before January 31, 1939?

Mrs. Cox. Six years. I was married in 1940.

Senator MCKELLAR. Did you use your box in your love affair with your present husband ?

Mrs. Cox. No; I did not.
Senator MCKELLAR, You did not?
Mrs. Cox. No.
Senator McKELLAR. That is all. I will turn her over to the Chair.

Senator KNOWLAND. May I ask about Miss Capibianco? Did she work for the TVA? Mrs. Cox. No; she did not. She worked for a coal company.

Senator KNOWLAND. Did she have any affiliation, to your knowledge, with the Communist Party! Mrs. Cox. No; she did not. Senator KNOWLAND. Did she know Mr. Hart, so far as you know? Mrs. Cox. She did not. Senator McKELLAR. I overlooked one thing. You worked for the TVA; did you not? Mrs. Cox. Yes, I did, Senator. Senator MCKELLAR. Did you pay a check for this post office box?

Mrs. Cox. Did I pay it? I always paid it in cash because it was my own box. Senator MCKELLAR. You paid it in cash and not in a check ? Mrs. Cox. I always paid in cash; I never paid by check. Senator MCKELLAR. All right. Senator McMahon. Has Mr. Barker been down to see you lately? Mrs. Cox. Mr. Barker! Senator McMahon. Yes; do you know a Mr. Barker, an investigator for the old Dies Committee? Mrs. Cox. No; I do not. Senator McMahon. You are living in Florida now? Mrs. Cox. That is right.

Senator McMahon. Have you been approached on testifying in this matter lately?

Mrs. Cox. No, sir.

Senator McMahon. You just received a subpena and came in answer to a subpena?

Mrs. Cox. That is right.
Senator KNOWĻAND. Do you know Mr. Smith, formerly with the
TVA?
Mrs. Cox. What Smith was that?
Senator MCKELLAR. James L. Smith.
Senator KNOWLAND. James L. Smith.
Mrs. Cox. I did not know him personally; no.
Senator KNOWLAND. Has he had any contact with you relative to
testimony before this committee?

Mrs. Cox. No.
Senator KNOWLAND. Has anyone discussed the matter with you?

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