Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy

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Cambridge University Press, 21.07.2003
This book offers a comprehensive account of Kant's theory of freedom and his moral anthropology. The point of departure is the apparent conflict between three claims to which Kant is committed: that human beings are transcendentally free, that moral anthropology studies the empirical influences on human beings, and that more anthropology is morally relevant. Frierson shows why this conflict is only apparent. He draws on Kant's transcendental idealism and his theory of the will and describes how empirical influences can affect the empirical expression of one's will in a way that is morally significant but still consistent with Kant's concept of freedom. As a work which integrates Kant's anthropology with his philosophy as a whole, this book will be an unusually important source of study for all Kant scholars and advanced students of Kant.
 

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Inhalt

Preface page ix
1
The Asymmetry in Kants Conception of Freedom
13
Anthropology as an Empirical Science
31
The Moral Importance of Kants Pragmatic Anthropology
48
Moral Anthropology in Contemporary Neokantian Ethics
68
Transcendental Idealism Radical Evil and Moral
95
Notes
167
References
200
Name Index
207
Urheberrecht

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