Dixie Betrayed: How the South Really Lost the Civil War

Cover
U of Nebraska Press, 01.10.2007 - 338 Seiten
For more than a century, conventional wisdom has held that the South lost the Civil War because of bad luck and overwhelming Union strength. The politicians and generals on the Confederate side have been lionized as noble warriors who bravely fought for states? rights. But in Dixie Betrayed, historian David J. Eicher reveals the real story, a calamity of political conspiracy, discord, and dysfunction that cost the South the Civil War. ø Drawing on a wide variety of previously unexplored sources, Eicher shows how President Jefferson Davis viciously fought with the Confederate House and Senate, state governors, and his own cabinet. Some Confederate senators threatened one another with physical violence; others were hopeless idealists who would not bend even when victory depended on flexibility. Military commanders were assigned not on the basis of skill but because of personal connections. Davis frequently interfered with his generals, micromanaging their field campaigns, ignoring the chain of command, and sometimes trusting utterly incompetent men. Even more problematic, some states wanted to set themselves up as separate nations, further undermining a unified war effort. Tensions were so extreme that the vice president of the Confederacy refused to live in the same state as Davis. ø Dixie Betrayed blasts away previous myths about the Civil War. It is essential reading for Civil War buffs and for anyone interested in how governments of any age can self-destruct during wartime.
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Dixie betrayed: how the South really lost the Civil War

Nutzerbericht  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Eicher (The Longest Night: A Military History of the Civil War ) turns to the personalities and politics of the Confederate government to explore and explain the South�s failure to win its ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

Prologue
9
Birth of a Nation
19
Portrait of a President
39
The War Department
51
A Curious Cabinet
65
The Military High Command
79
State Rightisms
93
Richmond the Capital
110
The President versus the Congress
208
Military Highs and Lows
226
Slaves as Soldiers?
246
Peace Proposals
258
Epilogue Despair
278
Postlude
288
Executive Officers of the Confederate States 18611865
295
Congresses of the Confederate States 18611865
296

The Rise of Lee and Bragg
125
An Uneasy Brotherhood
136
Jockeying for Position
155
Politics Spinning Out of Control
168
Cant We All Get Along?
182
Soiled Reputations
196
Acknowledgments
302
Notes
305
Bibliography
318
Index
327
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Über den Autor (2007)

David J. Eicher is the author of numerous books about the Civil War, including The Longest Night.

Bibliografische Informationen