Report of the Council of Hygiene and Public Health of the Citizens' Association of New York upon the sanitary condition of the City (Google eBook)

Frontcover
D. Appleton and Co., 1865 - 360 Seiten
0 Rezensionen
  

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt


Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite liii - Lord PALMERSTON would therefore suggest, that the best course which the people of this country can pursue, to deserve that the further progress of the Cholera should be stayed, will be, to employ the interval that will elapse between the present time and the beginning of next spring, in planning and executing measures by which those portions of...
Seite 55 - At high tide the water often wells up through the floors, submerging them to a considerable depth. In very many cases the vaults of privies are situated on the same or a higher level, and their contents frequently ooze through the walls into the occupied apartments beside them.
Seite cxxiii - The fact that, in modem times, the subject of hygiene generally, and State Medicine in particular, has commenced to attract so much the public attention, is undoubtedly owing to the application of statistics to public health. It is impossible for any nation, or for any Government, to remain indifferent when, in figures which admit of no denial, the national amount of health and happiness, or disease and suffering, is determined.
Seite liii - Lord Palmerston would, therefore, suggest that the best course which the people of this country can pursue to deserve that the further progress of the cholera should be stayed, will be to employ the interval that will elapse between the present time and the beginning of next spring in planning and executing measures by which those portions of their towns and cities which are inhabited by the poorest classes, and which, from the nature of things, must most need purification and improvement, may be...
Seite xliii - ... from time to time to those who are chiefly concerned in sanitary evils and their removal, so as effectually to bring home to the dwellers in darkness, ignorance, and disease, the immense significance of the facts taught by these figures.
Seite 76 - The Inspector of the Sixth Ward says : "Do- t mestic garbage and filth of every kind is thrown into the streets, covering their surface, filling the gutters, obstructing the sewer culverts, and sending forth perennial emanations which must generate pestiferous disease. In winter the filth and garbage, etc., accumulate in the streets, to the depth sometimes of two or three feet.
Seite lxxvi - ... back to back with other buildings, correspondingly situated on parallel streets; the courts and alleys are more greedily encroached upon and narrowed into unventilated, unlighted, damp, and well-like holes between the many-storied front and rear...
Seite lxxx - barracks" has apartments for 126 families. It was built especially for this use. It stands on a lot 50 by 250 feet,' is entered at the sides from alleys eight feet wide, and, by reason of the vicinity of another barrack of equal height, the rooms are so darkened that on a cloudy day it is impossible to read or sew in them without artificial light.
Seite lxxv - ... about the wharves and thoroughfares, rendered a near residence of much importance. At this period, rents were moderate, and a mechanic with family could hire two or more comfortable and even commodious apartments, in a house once occupied by wealthy people, for less than half what he is now obliged to pay for narrow and unhealthy quarters. This state of tenantry comfort did not, however, continue long; for the rapid march of improvement speedily enhanced the value of property in the lower wards...
Seite 49 - ... tell that decay and death are usurping the place of health and life. Two older children are in the street, which is their only playground, and the only place where they can go to breathe an atmosphere that is even comparatively pure. A fourth child, emaciated to a skeleton, and with that ghastly and unearthly look which marasmus impresses on its victims, has reared its feeble frame on a rickety chair against the window sill, and is striving to get a glimpse at the smiling heavens whose light...

Bibliografische Informationen